Nashville to Memphis

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Cruise Summary

AMERICAN MUSIC CRUISE - Journey from one musical mecca to the next as you begin in in Music City, Nashville and end in Memphis, the Birthplace of Rock ‘n’ Roll. Discover the sights and sounds of America's rivers and the roots from which sprung a variety of musical genres with our special onboard entertainment and focused lectures highlighting the music of the region through which you are traveling. With Nashville’s Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum celebrating its 50th anniversary, there has never been a better time to explore the abundance of exhibits honoring the legacy of American music. Whether it's the sounds of New Orleans Jazz, the strains of the uniquely American musical art form the Delta Blues, the Rock and Soul of Memphis, or the homegrown Country Music melodies from Nashville, it all harmonizes with the rhythms of the river.
 

Theme:
• Music of America*
 

Included Tours:
• See ports of call below for information on included tours.
 

Premium Shore Excursions:
• See ports of call below for the options available to you. Click Here to learn more and to place reservations.
 

*All themed entertainment, events and tours are subject to change without notice. 

Itinerary

Vessel: American Duchess™



Day 1: Boutique Hotel - Nashville, TN

Boutique Hotel - Nashville, TN

Enjoy your included, one-night stay at the iconic Gaylord Opryland Resort in Nashville. The evening is yours to get self-acquainted with all that this legendary "Music City" has to offer.

Our Hospitality Desk will be located in the hotel for your convenience between 3:00 PM and 7:00 PM. It is here that our friendly staff can assist with everything from general questions about your upcoming voyage to reserving Premium Shore Excursions. An American Queen Steamboat Company representative, as well as a local representative, will be readily available to provide you with dining, entertainment, and sight-seeing suggestions so that you may maximize your time in Nashville.

Day 2: Nashville, TN

Nashville, TN

Explore Nashville at your leisure or consider a Pre-Cruise Premium Shore Excursion with afternoon transfer to the American Duchess.

Special Event: Opry at the Ryman
The Grand Ole Opry is the show that made country music famous. The Opry features a dynamic line-up of new stars, superstars, and legends of country music. Unlike a typical concert, the Opry presents eight or more artists on each show, giving the audience a sample of each artist's musical style.

After a delicious dinner onboard, join us as we make our way to the iconic Ryman Auditorium for a Grand Ole Opry show! Don’t miss out on this exclusive included event as the perfect beginning to your voyage on the American Duchess.

Pre-Cruise: Nashville Music City USA Tour

Discover all that Music City USA has to offer! The American Queen Steamboat Company's exclusive Music City USA Tour delivers the full “Country Music Experience.”

Depart the Pre-Cruise Hotel and Discover all that Music City USA has to offer! The exclusive Music City USA Tour delivers the full “Country Music Experience.” Embark on the next leg of your journey with an escorted Nashville City Tour. Our expert guide will enhance your tour with local stories and lore of “Music City,” a town unique and rich in music’s history. Included in this exclusive Nashville experience is admission into one of Country Music’s greatest tribute museums, The Country Music Hall of Fame.

As we pull up, you will most definitely spot the building – the massive museum showcases piano keys that span the entire building. The museum is nicknamed “The Smithsonian of Country Music” because of it absolutely remarkable collection. Here, guests can experience the sounds of country’s biggest stars before continuing on with a driving tour of Nashville, including iconic sights throughout Music City. In the core exhibition, stop by “Sing Me Back Home” and “A Journey Through Country Music” which are the museum’s permanent exhibits. Country Music Hall of Fame frequently updates their showcases – and they will never disappoint!

This tour includes a lunch stop at Broadway where guests can enjoy a true Nashville lunch on their own in one of the many restaurants and Honky Tonks in the area.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
Call for pricing
Duration
5.5 hours
Tour Capacity
100 guests

Day 3: Leisurely River Cruising

Departure 6:00 AM
Leisurely River Cruising

There is always plenty to do between dawn and dusk on the river and today is the perfect day to enjoy the many public spaces and activities that are available to you onboard. Gaze at the beautiful landscapes and small river towns as you mingle with fellow guests and discuss the unique aspects of river life. If you fancy a moment for yourself, retreat to The Lincoln Library adorned with ornate bookcases stocked with an imaginative selection. Take hold of a literary classic, curl up on a plush chair in a cozy corner and relish every moment of  serenity. Our fitness facility, business center, movie theater and grand lobby offer a more stimulating day on the river for those who wish to indulge in more energy-infused activity. However you wish to spend your day, make it your own and revel in every moment.

Day 4: Clarksville, TN

Clarksville, TN

Clarksville is the fifth fastest growing city in the United States while keeping their small town charm. Founded in 1784 and incorporated as a town in 1785, Clarksville was named for Revolutionary War hero General George Rogers Clark. The town is lined with history ranging for centuries and can be seen through prime examples of Victorian and Roman styles of architecture that are prevalent throughout the city.

Smith-Trahern Mansion
Built in 1858 by wealthy tobacconist Christopher Smith, this majestic antebellum home overlooks the Cumberland River. Constructed during the troubled pre Civil War era, the architecture reflects Greek Revival and Italianate styles. The home boasts grand hallways, an exquisite curved staircase and a “widow’s walk” on the roof. This beautiful home overlooks the Cumberland River. It was designed by Adolphus Heiman in 1858 for a wealthy tobacconist by the name Christopher Smith. The home reflects the transition between Greek Revival and Italianate styles, which were very popular at that time. Although not as large as some, the home boasts grand hallways, an exquisite curved staircase and a “widow” walk" on the roof. The original main building consisted of four large rooms on each of the two floors, opening onto both the hallways and the balconies. The kitchen was attached to the back of the house, but there was no connecting door. Of the many outbuildings that must have been on the property at this time, only the slave's quarters remains.

Montgomery County Courthouse
Originally constructed in the 1800’s, the Courthouse and Courts Complex is a blend of state of the art technology and historic charm. Restored after the 1999 tornado, this architectural beauty is the symbol of Clarksville’s historic downtown. Adorning the corridors of both buildings are 150 photographs illustrating the history and heritage of Montgomery County.

Customs House Museum and Cultural Center
Built in 1898 as a US Post Office and Customs House for the flourishing tobacco trade, this architecturally fascinating structure is among the most photographed buildings in the region. The state’s second largest general museum, the center features rotating shows, galleries and a sculpture garden. This center, located in the center of downtown Clarksville, is the State’s second largest general museum. The 1898 portion of the Museum was originally designed for use as a Federal Post Office and Custom House to handle the large volume of foreign mail created by the city’s international tobacco business. It measures 62 feet, 2 inches by 62 feet, 2 inches overall and is built on a smooth stone foundation. The brick exterior has decorative terra cotta around all openings and on the corners. The hipped roof with flared eaves is made of slate over long leaf pine, with the roof framing being of steel construction. The floor is of Knoxville, Tennessee marble, and the plastered walls feature extensive natural white oak trim. The building contains three vaults. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. With over 35,000 square feet of exhibit space, hands-on activities and special events, this museum can keep everyone busy. Explore the expansive museum visiting galleries displaying fine art, science, and history. Enjoy the museum’s collection of model trains that ride around the tracks each day.

Fort Defiance Interpretive Center and Park
In April of 2011, the Fort Defiance Civil War Park opened its doors to the new interpretive center, kicking off the 150th anniversary of the war that defined a century and changed the country. Fort Defiance overlooks the Red and Cumberland Rivers and has a breathtaking view of the Downtown. Visitors are encouraged to walk the trails and enjoy the history that the location represents. Displays, cannons and the occasional re-enactors are just some of things you can enjoy on your visit to Fort Defiance. In November 1861, Confederate troops began to build a defensive fort that would control the river approach to Clarksville. They mounted three guns in the fort. On February 19, 1862, Federal gunboats came up the river from Fort Donelson and reported the fort displayed a white flag and was deserted. The Federals took over the fort and enlarged it so that it would control traffic on the Hopkinsville Pike. Clarksville was left with a small garrison of Union Troops. In April 1862, this small garrison was made up of the 71st Ohio Volunteers commanded by Col. Rodney Mason. During July and August 1862, there was an increase in guerrilla activity around Clarksville. On August 18, 1862, Clarksville was recaptured by Confederate Calvary. Union soldiers were sent from Fort Donelson to retake Clarksville in September 1862. Battles were fought at New Providence on September 6, 1862 and at Riggins Hill on September 7, 1862. The town and fort were reoccupied by Federal troops who remained for the rest of the war. Col. Bruce was placed in command at Clarksville and Fort Defiance was renamed Fort Bruce.

Trinity Episcopal Church
Trinity Episcopal Parish in Clarksville was founded in 1832 and is one of the five oldest Episcopal parishes in Tennessee. Its first building was erected in 1838. During the Civil War, Trinity was one of the few local churches allowed to remain open by the Union forces that occupied Clarksville because the rector insisted that “decent and orderly” worship transcended politics and even war. In 1873 the original building was demolished, and the current Romanesque building was completed in 1877. On January 22, 1999, a tornado ripped through Clarksville, and the church was hit hard. A portion of the roof collapsed and part of the steeple was knocked over, but the walls remained, providing enough structure to begin restoration.

Ultimate Christmas Cookie Bake-Off

Today, we embark on a journey back to an age of refinement and authentic southern charm with a visit to the renowned Tanglewood House. Our day begins by departing the vessel in beautiful Clarksville, Tennessee, the state's very first incorporated city and home of the iconic Roxy Theatre, located in Clarksville's Historic Downtown District. But the timeless culture of Clarksville can be best exemplified at our chosen destination: the celebrated Tanglewood House.

The Tanglewood Estate sits like an untouched slice of nineteenth-century America, nestled right in the heart of the city. These grounds are steeped in history, soaked in the stories of the past. Step foot on the same grounds that musical performances of Minnie Pearl and other members of Nashville country-western royalty were held. Pass by an authentic log cabin that, back in the 1790s, President Andrew Jackson called home.

Inside Tanglewood House, with its remarkable brick and wrought iron architecture, shaded beneath majestic, 100-year-old oak trees, we will experience a unique intersection of stately elegance and quaint, old-fashioned austerity. Here, we will take part in yet another world-renowned tradition of the American South, as guests take part in a home-style cookie baking demonstration by Tanglewood's expert chefs. But the activities don't stop there! We'll get hands-on in the Tanglewood kitchen as guests are divided into teams to compete in the ultimate cookie bake-off competition.

While our culinary creations are in the oven, we will relax with complimentary snacks and punch, and fill out Christmas cards to deployed American soldiers, along with some cookies! Then comes the only thing more fun than baking the cookies: tasting them! The newly crowned cookie-baking champion can hold his or her head a little higher as we make our way back to the dock.

Transportation
Included
Price
Call for pricing
Duration
2 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 5: Dover, TN

Dover, TN

Stewart County is a small county enriched with history, picture-perfect scenery, and welcoming citizens. Guests are greeted with nature's beauty and wildlife surrounding the city. Located at the county's heart is Dover, its county seat and the home of Fort Donel­son National Park. This peaceful, picturesque town is the location of one of the most historic battles of the Civil War - a battle that changed the direction of the war for the North. Today, bald eagles call this park their home as and soar through the skies; a true symbol of freedom. Although small and rural, Dover has much to offer her visitors who can enjoy a delicious meal at one of the many local restaurants or take in the comforting hometown charm found throughout the city. Dover and Stewart County are the perfect gateway to a simple, cozy, quiet, country experience.

Fort Donelson
Explore the battlefield where Union and Confederate soldiers fought in February of 1862. Discover the history of the past displayed inside the Visitor Center or scattered across the battlefield, where monuments, plaques, and canyons portray the battle that ultimately ended with the Union forces capturing Fort Donelson. The construction of the Fort Donelson started in the year 1861 by Daniel S. Donelson and was named after him. During the Civil War of the 1860s, the Union forces were heading south to fight the Confederacy. Fort Donelson was key because of its location on the Cumberland River. When Fort Donelson was captured by the Union in February 1862, it was their first major victory for the Civil War. With the fort under Union control, they now had the door open to the Confederacy, ensuring that Kentucky would stay in the Union and opening up Tennessee for a Northern advance along the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers. At Fort Donelson, visitors can learn about the battle, view the earthworks and cannons, and take a walk through the area on one of two trails. There also are areas for picnics, parking, and strolls along the Cumberland River, as well as a Visitor Center, where guests can learn the history of the war leading up to this battle and the events that occurred after it was finished.

Fort Donelson National Cemetery
The Fort Donelson National Cemetery in Dover, Tennessee was established in 1867 as a burial ground for Union soldiers killed in a significant early Civil War battle. Today, the cemetery contains the graves of veterans representing the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, and the wars in Korea and Vietnam. Fort Donelson National Cemetery is one of 14 national cemeteries managed by the National Park Service and is a part of the Fort Donelson National Battlefield. In July 1862, Congress passed legislation giving the President of the United States the authority to purchase land for the establishment of cemeteries “for soldiers who shall die in the service of their country.” The legislation effectively began the National Cemetery System. In 1863, the Union Army abandoned the Confederate works and constructed a new fortification on the ground that became the cemetery site. A freedmen's community developed around the new Union fort. Four years later, this same site was selected for the establishment of the Fort Donelson National Cemetery and 670 Union soldiers were reinterred here. These soldiers (including 512 unknowns) had been buried on the battlefield, in local cemeteries, in hospital cemeteries, and in nearby towns. These totals include five known and nine unknown soldiers from the United States Colored Troops. In 1867, Fort Donelson Cemetery was established as the final resting for Union soldiers and sailors initially buried in the Fort Donelson area. Today the national cemetery contains both Civil War veterans and veterans who have served the United States since that time.

The Surrender House/Dover Hotel
This 1850s building was originally the Dover Hotel and was a popular stop for travelers of the time. During the Battle at Fort Donelson, General Buckner and his staff used the hotel as their headquarters during the battle. It also served as a Union hospital after the surrender. After Buckner accepted Grant's surrender terms, the two generals met here to work out the details. Today, the building is restored and showcases historical artifacts and galleries. Built between 1851 and 1853, the Dover Hotel accommodated riverboat travelers before and after the Civil War. The Dover Hotel was the site of the "unconditional surrender" of General Buckner to General Grant, on February 16, 1862. Grant's terms of "unconditional and immediate surrender" were described by Buckner as "ungenerous and unchivalrous.” This was the Union Army's first major victory of the Civil War, setting the stage for invasion of the south and eventual capture of the Mississippi River Valley. The structure was originally built in 1851, and still stands in the heart of Dover. The structure had served as General Buckner's headquarters during the battle. The Fort Donelson House Historical Association and the National Park Service restored the house in the 1970s, and today the exterior looks much as it did at the time of the surrender.

Stewart County Visitor Center
Explore the Stewart County Visitor Center to learn about the history and future of the city of Dover. Walk through the Gallery located inside to get a visual representation of the city’s culture and history or talk to a resident at the Visitor Information Desk to hear their own piece of Dover history! Stewart County proudly opened its Visitor Center in October 2010. It has been a beautiful addition to the county and serves the community on multiple facets. The Center includes a Visitor Information Desk, where guests can discover the history of the county, hear about how the city is changing and improving through future plans, and even get tips on the best local eateries and stores. Take a tour through the Gallery, where the history and culture of Stewart County is highlighted through interesting articles, incredible art pieces, and rare artifacts, and then relax in the comfort of the fireplace.

Stewart County Historical Society Museum
This historical building showcases the history, culture, and customs of the city of Dover. Guests can explore many displays of local art, artifacts, and photographs as local experts recount the stories of this historical county. The Stewart County Tennessee Historical Society Museum is in the heart of Dover, TN. The museum houses an abundant collection of rich information on the county’s history, culture, and customs. While visiting the Historical Society Museum, guests have the opportunity to explore the county’s one-room schoolhouse and the history found inside, the beautiful Stewart County quilt showcased for all to see, and many more displays that demonstrate the local history. The building is also used to host many local events from charity dinners and dancing nights to educational seminars and talent shows, the Stewart County Historical Society Museum works hard to bring the community together.

Day 6: Paducah, KY

Paducah, KY

Paducah embraces their harmonious history between the European settlers and the Padoucca Indians native to the area. The city is located at the confluence of the Ohio and the Tennessee Rivers and because of this, it is often called the Four-Rivers Area due to the proximity of the Ohio, Cumberland, Tennessee, and Mississippi Rivers. This prime location has played a major role in Paducah’s history, as transportation was easily accessible – the economy was strong and travelers were frequent!

National Quilt Museum
25 years in the making- the National Quilt Museum supports quilters and aims to advance the art of quilting by displaying exceptional quilt and fiber art exhibits. This museum celebrates the work of today’s quilters and offers a variety of unique exhibits that change throughout the year. Forget what you think quilting is—the National Quilt Museum isn’t full of dated simple block quilting, but exhibits works of art with a quilt as a canvas. Be certain to stop by, this museum is a must see!Celebrating 25 years in 2016, The National Quilt Museum is the largest of its kind in the world. It is the portal to the contemporary quilt experience - exhibits and workshops by renowned quilters who are implementing creative approaches to fiber art. The 27,000-square-foot contemporary structure features three galleries highlighting a collection of contemporary quilts and changing thematic exhibitions that celebrate the talent and diversity of the global quilting community. Workshops taught by world-class fiber art instructors are offered year-round. The Museum Shop & Book Store offers Kentucky Crafted items and quilt-related instructional and collector books.

Lowertown Arts District
Paducah’s oldest neighborhood is famous for the award-winning Artist Relocation Program that prompted its colorful revitalization which continues today with the expansion of the Paducah School of Art & Design campus. The Arts District is populated with working artists, students and artists-in-residence who add to the City’s vibrant artistic landscape.

The Lloyd Tilghman House & Civil War Museum
Prepare to be amazed at the significant influence Paducah had on the outcome of the Civil War. Generals U.S. Grant, Nathan Bedford Forrest, and others made their astounding contributions to history here. Hear this untold story inside the 1852 Greek revival home of Confederate General Lloyd Tilghman. This historic Greek revival house was built in 1852 for Lloyd Tilghman, a new member of Paducah’s community at the time. After the house was completed, Tilghman did not purchase the property, instead, the builder, Robert Woolfolk became the sole owner of the house and grounds. Tilghman, his wife, their seven children, and five slaves resided in the home until 1861. It was then that Woolfolk and his family moved into the home. They family was pro-South and proudly flew a Confederate flag causing many uproars over the community and with the Federal Troops who located their headquarters just across the street from the home. Eventually Woolfolk and his family were banished from Paducah and the United States, forced to live in Canada on August 1, 1864.

The Paducah Railroad Museum
A project of the Paducah Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society showcases equipment and memorabilia from the romantic past of America’s railroads. New simulator gives the sensation of riding a locomotive cab. The original Freight House (Across the parking lot from the Museum) was built in 1925 by the Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis Railway. In 1996, the freight house was sold and the Museum moved to a building one-half block away. Here, learn the history of the railroad and those who used it, explore the authentic train models, and enjoy the memorabilia showcased for guests.

River Discovery Center
Celebrate Paducah’s maritime legacy and lore with interactive, water-filled exhibits, including a working model of a lock and dam. Captain a towboat, pleasure watercraft or Coast Guard buoy tender through various scenarios in the new pilothouse simulator. Take a turn behind the pilot wheel to experience river traffic at the Port of Paducah. In 1988 Mayor Gerry Montgomery and his committee pursued the development of a museum to showcase the Four Rivers Region maritime heritage. The River Heritage Center was planned in 1992 as the very beginning stages of the mayor’s dream. Years later the museum was located by Seamen’s Church Institute of New York and renamed the River Heritage Museum before finally receiving its’ current name, the River Discovery Center in 2008. Here explore artifacts, exhibits, and interactive displays that share the history of marine life and the history of the river.

Check-in Along the Chittlin' Trail

The year is 1915 and America is disjointed by segregation and heavily governed by Jim Crow Laws. In the heart of the country sat Paducah, Kentucky, a quaint, yet bustling city on the Chittlin’ Trail. Deemed one of the very few safe and acceptable areas for African American entertainers to perform in the early to mid-1900s, the Chittlin’ Trail saw hundreds of musicians as they made the journey from New Orleans to Chicago leaving traces of jazz, blues and soul in their wake.

A rustic colonial structure adorned with simple white lettering across the front porch reading, “Hotel Metropolitan” became a safe haven for these traveling musicians. Step into the radiating heat of the Kentucky sun and meet Miss Maggie, a ball of southern energy and hospitality, as she opens the door to this historical hotel … time turns back a century. Miss Maggie used her undeniable determination and willpower to establish this much needed “colored” hotel in 1909, an almost unfathomable task for a black woman at the time.

Follow Miss Maggie through the rooms as she shares the rich history this hotel has stowed in its walls. Listen as she gossips about its past boarders, including B.B. King, Billie Holiday, Ike and Tina Turner, just to name a few in the hotel’s famous guest book. If you listen closely, you can almost hear the laughter and music reverberating through the halls of the old hotel, billowing out into the streets of Paducah and enveloping the neighborhood.

The Hotel Metropolitan, “The Respectable Place to Stay Since 1909,” is a project of Save America’s Treasures, a US government initiative created in 1998 to preserve and protect historic buildings, arts, and published works.

Note: This tour is not handicapped accessible.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

 

Transportation
Included
Price
Call for pricing
Duration
1.5 hours
Tour Capacity
16 guests

Day 7: Leisurely River Cruising

Leisurely River Cruising

There is always plenty to do between dawn and dusk on the river and today is the perfect day to enjoy the many public spaces and activities that are available to you onboard. Gaze at the beautiful landscapes and small river towns as you mingle with fellow guests and discuss the unique aspects of river life. If you fancy a moment for yourself, retreat to The Lincoln Library adorned with ornate bookcases stocked with an imaginative selection. Take hold of a literary classic, curl up on a plush chair in a cozy corner and relish every moment of  serenity. Our fitness facility, business center, movie theater and grand lobby offer a more stimulating day on the river for those who wish to indulge in more energy-infused activity. However you wish to spend your day, make it your own and revel in every moment.

Day 8: New Madrid, MO

New Madrid, MO

New Madrid was founded in 1776 by Spanish Governor Esteban Rodríguez Miró who welcomed Anglo-Saxon settlers but required them to become citizens of Spain and live under the guidance of his appointed impresario, Revolutionary War veteran, Colonel William Morgan of New Jersey. Some 2,000 settled in the region. In 1800, Spain traded the territory to France in the Third Treaty of San Ildefonso, who promptly sold it to the United States in the Louisiana Purchase. The city is remembered as being the nearby location for the Mississippi River military engagement, the Battle of Island Number Ten, during the Civil War. The city is famous for being the site of a series of over 1,000 earthquakes in 1811 and 1812, caused by what is called the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Today, explore this quaint river town that will surely steal the hearts of all guests.

New Madrid Observation Deck
Stroll off the American Duchess and over to the New Madrid Observation Deck. Jutting out across the Mighty Mississippi, guests can get a picture-perfect view of the river.

New Madrid Historical Museum
Located on the Mississippi River in the building that was once the Kendall Saloon, the New Madrid Historical Museum reflects the history of New Madrid from as far back as the Native Americans to present-day. Learn about the active New Madrid fault and how it has made an impact on this river town and shop the gift shop for unique treasures to remind you of your trip to New Madrid. Located in the former Kendall Saloon off of Main Street, the New Madrid Historical Museum shares the history of this river town from the Mississippian period through the 20th century. Here, guests can explore the great earthquakes of 1811 and 1812, documented with seismographic recordings, Native American artifacts, Civil War artifacts, early family life in the city of New Madrid during the 19th and 20th centuries, and the gift shop!

Hunter-Dawson State Historic Site
The Hunter-Dawson State Historic Site was created to preserve a time of the past. Guests can explore the Bootheel Mansion and learn about the history of the era. Tour this 15-room estate turned museum built in 1860 by William and Amanda Hunter, local store owners. Guests can view the entire historic home and enjoy the beauty of a time gone by. With most of the original furniture still intact this location is a uniquely preserved relic from the late 1880s. Hunter-Dawson State Historic Site preserves a now-vanished part of Missouri: The stately Bootheel mansion. Filled with original pieces and furnished in the style it was in during its heydays of the 1860s-1880s, the ornate mansion provides a history lesson in every corner. Most of the original furnishing purchased by Amanda Hunter, the house's first owner (with her husband William) are still in the house.

Higgerson School
This one room school house provides guests with a glimpse into the life of a student attending this historic school. Guests can learn about this 1948 school house and how its practices proved to be essential cornerstones of America’s early 19th century education system. Restored to the one-room school that operated at Higgerson Landing in 1948, the Higgerson School is a window to the educational practices that shaped and served rural America from the early 19th century. Experience the typical school day of children attending all eight grades in one room with one teacher. Relive the days of playing "Wolf Over and River" and “Caterpillars," a trip to the outdoor facility and crossing the fence on the stile. Visit Higgerson Landing Gift Shop before heading to your next stop.

Hart-Stepp House Art Gallery
Stop here to tour the oldest house in New Madrid. Currently owned by the New Madrid Historical Museum, the house was built by Abraham Augustine and moved to its current location in an effort to escape the rising rivers of the Mississippi. Today, the Hart-Stepp House is home to an extensive photography and painting collection. The oldest house in New Madrid, owned by the New Madrid Historical Museum, was built by Abraham Augustine and moved to its present location in order to escape the encroaching waters of the Mississippi River is now home to the newest attraction to the community, the Hart-Stepp House Art Gallery. The house is used often as a place to offer workshops and classes. Plans for the future include a photo studio and the establishment of a photography club for area school students.  New Madrid County Courthouse - In 1812 New Madrid was a vast county extending south through much of Arkansas. The area was cut roughly in half during the following year, and even further reductions came by 1816. New Madrid County, located by the Mississippi, was one of Missouri’s earliest counties. The town of New Madrid was founded in 1783, and the county was organized in 1812. First courts met in New Madrid, but county records previous to 1816 are missing. After the devastating earthquake of 1811 and repeated flooding of the Mississippi, the court chose an inland site for the county seat. For the 20th century courthouse, New Madrid County purchased a new site north of the original town in March 1915. From architects who presented plans, the court selected those from H. G. Clymer of St. Louis. Clymer's plan was for a brick building 107 by 75 feet with stone trim. Additional funds for finishing the courthouse and jail were authorized early in 1917, but no bids were received. World War I was beginning, and the labor force was reduced. Finally, W. W. Taylor, a master builder from Cape Girardeau, superintended final interior work, which was completed in January 1919. Final costs exceeded $100,000. This courthouse continues in use as New Madrid's seat of justice.

Day 9: Memphis, TN

Arrival 8:00 AM
Memphis, TN

Thank you for cruising with us! We hope that you had a memorable experience and look forward to welcoming you aboard in the future. Enjoy Memphis at your leisure or consider a Post-Cruise Premium Shore Excursion with airport transfer.

Post-Cruise: Memphis City Tour Including Graceland Mansion

Experience the town that “The King” called home on a guided journey through Memphis! Put on your blue suede shoes and board the American Queen Steamboat Company's motorcoach as it departs towards Memphis’ most iconic attraction, The Graceland Mansion.

Upon entering The Graceland Mansion, the presence of Elvis can still be felt within the walls as you walk through the very same rooms as he did after a long day’s performance. Custom crafted and state-of-the art iPads will help guide your way through each room, providing thoughtful narration by actor and Elvis enthusiast, John Stamos as well as personal commentary by Elvis’ daughter, Lisa Marie Pressley.

At The Graceland Mansion discover distinctly “Elvis” rooms such as the famous “Jungle Room,” a homage to “The King’s” love for Hawaii featuring green shagged carpets, exotically carved woodwork, and a Polynesian feel. View “Vernon’s Office,” where Elvis’ father, Vernon Presley, managed his career, as well as the Trophy Building and Racquetball Building where you will find hundreds of awards and accolades received throughout his career in addition to those awarded posthumously. Just outside the mansion, take a short stroll through the Meditation Garden where “The King’s” final resting place is located alongside other members of his family. Pay your respects to Elvis and his contributions to American music and entertainment, knowing his legacy resonates throughout the world and spans multiple generations.

Next on the Memphis experience, we will embark on a short, narrated driving tour of the "Music City" before concluding our journey through Memphis.

Note: This excursion begins at the vessel's dock and concludes at the official Post-Cruise Hotel or Memphis International Airport.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
Call for pricing
Duration
4.5 hours
Tour Capacity
150 guests
Post-Cruise: The Elvis Experience

Includes a Platinum Access Pass to Graceland, a Guided Excursion through Memphis and a Walk on Beale Street with Local Musical Icon

Continue your journey along the Mississippi River with a king’s treatment as we depart the vessel and weave our way through the streets of Memphis towards its’ heart and soul – Beale Street.

Oozing with the gritty feeling of the blues and rock ‘n’ roll, Beale Street’s musical history is alive in every store front lining the road, street band performing on the corner, and brick paving our way. A larger-than-life iconic brass statue of Elvis marks the starting point of the “Walking in Memphis” portion of this exclusive excursion. Here, a charismatic and spirited local musician joins us and welcomes us to the city he calls home. As our personal and exclusive guide, his enthusiasm and love for this southern city becomes infectious as he narrates stories of his favorite attractions as we walk past. A stroll along Beale Street is littered with music, history, culture and the sweet smell of smokey barbeque wafting through the alleys.

The journey continues with Beale Street in our rearview and the home of The King himself ahead – Graceland Mansion! Enter through “The King’s” front door where the presence of Elvis can still be felt within the walls as you walk through the same rooms as he did after a long day’s performance. Custom crafted and state-of-the art iPads will help guide your way through each room, providing thoughtful narration by actor and Elvis enthusiast, John Stamos as well as personal commentary by Elvis’ daughter, Lisa Marie Presley.

At this musical mecca, discover distinctly “Elvis” rooms such as the famous “Jungle Room,” a homage to “The King’s” love for Hawaii featuring green shagged carpets, exotically carved woodwork, and a Polynesian feel. View “Vernon’s Office,” where Elvis’ father, Vernon Presley, managed his career, as well as the Trophy Building and Racquetball Building where you will find hundreds of awards and accolades received throughout his career in addition to those awarded posthumously. Just outside the mansion, take a short stroll through the Meditation Garden where “The King’s” final resting place is located alongside other members of his family. Pay your respects to Elvis and his contributions to American music and entertainment, knowing his legacy resonates throughout the world and spans multiple generations.

But the adventure doesn’t end there! This platinum experience continues with exclusive exhibits including:

• Graceland Mansion Audio-Guided Tour with New Orientation Film

• Full Access to State-of-the-Art Visitor Entertainment Complex - NEW!

• Elvis' Two Custom Airplanes

• Elvis Presley Car Museum - NEW!

• Elvis: The Entertainer Career Showcase Museum - NEW!

• Elvis Discover Exhibits - NEW!

You will not want to miss this exclusive experience through the Music City!

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
Call for pricing
Duration
4.75 hours
Tour Capacity
150 guests