Louisville to Pittsburgh

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Cruise Summary

RETURN TO PITTSBURGH - Uncover America's bucolic heartland as you travel the tranquil waters of the Ohio River from Louisville to Pittsburgh, the iconic city where names like Carnegie and Bessemer created the steel-making capital of the world.

Theme:
• Return to Pittsburgh*
 
Included Tours:
• See ports of call below for information on included tours.

Premium Shore Excursions:
• See ports of call below for the options available to you. Click Here to learn more and to place reservations.


*All themed entertainment, events and tours are subject to change without notice.

Itinerary

Vessel: American Duchess™



Day 1: Hotel Stay - Louisville, KY

Hotel Stay - Louisville, KY

Enjoy your complimentary stay at The Brown Hotel in downtown Louisville. The evening is yours to get self-acquainted with the famed eateries, unique shops and lively entertainment of Louisville. 

Our Hospitality Desk will be located in the hotel for your convenience between 3:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. It is here that our friendly staff can assist with everything from general questions about your upcoming voyage to reserving Premium Shore Excursions. An American Queen Steamboat Company representative, as well as a local representative, will be readily available to provide you with dining, entertainment, and sight-seeing suggestions so that you may maximize your time in Louisville.

Day 2: Louisville, KY

Departure 6:00 PM
Louisville, KY

Today is the day you have been waiting for! Prepare to embark on an unforgettable journey through history.

If you haven’t gotten your full dose of Louisville yet, visit the AQSC Hospitality Desk for ideas about how to spend your day. The official Voyage Check-In will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. During this time, our representatives will arrange for your transfer to the vessel and answer any questions you might have. The process is simple and will have you back to exploring in no time. If you have any additional questions, the Hospitality Desk will be at your service until the complimentary vessel transfers begin at 3:00 p.m.

Pre-Cruise: Private Churchill Downs Backstretch Experience

There are few American sporting events that showcase the same history, dating to 1875, and popularity as the Kentucky Derby. Perhaps it’s because this annual horse race, held at stunning Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky, is more than just a sporting event. It is its own culture, an event celebrating the authentic Southern lifestyle and the luxury associated with it. It is images of women, with beautiful, floppy hats, and men, dressed in regal attire, sipping fresh mint juleps, awaiting what is known as “the most exciting two minutes in sports,” that illustrate a glamorous atmosphere, which entices the rest of the world to join in.

On this American Queen exclusive excursion, join us as we journey to the “backstretch” of the racetrack during a rail-side, meet and greet with Churchill Downs equestrians! This once-in-a-lifetime experience will take us behind the scenes for a glimpse of thoroughbred racing at the “world’s most legendary racetrack.” Explore the grounds, where you can get a peek at more than 1,400 stalls and find yourself wondering how all of them could ever possibly be occupied with horses at once—but they are, every year. Then, get some insight from life beyond the track, as you listen to stories directly from a jockey, a trainer, a thoroughbred owner, and more!

Also included with this exclusive tour is admission to the Kentucky Derby Museum, where guests will have the opportunity to explore two levels of interactive exhibits, including “The Greatest Race,” a 360-degree immersive sound and visual experience that will give yet another vantage point of the iconic event. Guests will also have the chance to participate in a historic, walking tour of the Churchill Downs Racetrack, as well as an opportunity to meet the resident thoroughbred, rotated periodically each year, and a miniature horse named Winston. Be certain to conclude this amazing adventure at the Finish Line Gift Shop to choose a souvenir as a reminder of this experience.

Transportation
Provided
Duration
4 hours

Day 3: Madison, IN

Madison, IN

This quaint river town is sure to win your heart. Madison’s culture and heritage is weaved into nearly every stop, ensuring you a a glimpse of the beauty and history of antique machinery at the Schroeder House, or an example of fine craftsmanship at the Lanier Mansion State Historic Site, where the stunning Greek Revival architecture is sure to impress each of its visitors!

Schroeder Saddletree Factory
This factory is America’s very last 19th century saddletree factory. For 94 years, workers at the Ben Schroeder Saddletree Company crafted tens of thousands of wooden frames for saddle makers throughout the United States and Latin America. It was the nation’s longest lasting, continually operated, family owned saddletree company. After his death, Ben’s family kept his dream alive by adding stirrups, hames for horse collars, clothespins, lawn furniture and even work gloves to their line of saddletrees. The factory closed in 1972 and was left completely intact.

Broadway Fountain
One of Madison’s landmarks, the original Broadway Fountain stood in the middle of Broadway for almost 100 years before it was dismantled and replaced with the 1981 bronze copy or reproduction. The original Janes, Kirtland, and Company cast iron fountain was displayed at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. The only part of the original fountain that is still present in Fountain Park is a stone plinth that supported one of the original triton figures; it is set into the concrete at the south end of the central path as a base for a tablet that commemorates the replacement fountain.

Lanier Mansion State Historic Site
This Greek Revival style abode was built in 1844 and is often referred to as the “Crown Jewel of Madison’s Historic District. Tour this home adorned with historic architectural features and catch a breathtaking glimpse at the of Ohio River from the south portico beneath the colossal Corinthian columns. (only first floor is ADA, but guests have access to all 3 floors) Lanier Mansion is one of the best examples of Greek Revival architecture in the country and is considered to be the "Crown Jewel" of Madison’s Historic District. Designed by architect Francis Costigan, the mansion exhibits many original Greek Revival features including its square plan, the full façade porch on the south elevation, the Corinthian columns on the south portico, the Doric pilasters that appear on several locations on the exterior, the massive exterior entablature and dentilated cornice, the ornamental anthemia, the ornamental pediments over the windows and doors, and the Ionic columns that separate the double parlors on the first floor.

History Center and Railroad Museum
The History Center and Railroad Station Museum are owned and operated by the Jefferson County Historical Society. The History Center offers visitors a permanent exhibit gallery devoted to the history of Southern Indiana and the mid-Ohio Valley. It also contains a research library and archives. The Railroad Station Museum is a historic representation of an early 20th century passenger station. It features an octagonal waiting room that is two stories tall.

Jeremiah Sullivan House
Built in 1818 and considered Madison’s first mansion, this stately federal style structure was home to one of Madison’s most distinguished leaders, Jeremiah Sullivan. e house’s interior features most of the original woodwork and whitewashed plaster, as well as a full basement, an unusual feature in Madison during the mid-1800s. Trail Interactive exhibit!

Doctor Hutchings Office & Museum
The Dr. William D. Hutchings Office and Museum is one of the most authentic 19th century medical history restorations in the U.S. Built c. 1850 and originally used as a law office, Dr. Hutchings healed and comforted the sick here from 1878 until his death in 1903. Hundreds of the Dr. Hutchings medical records, surgical tools, books and other artifacts, including early electrical healing devices, fill the Office. Next door in the museum enjoy a sampling of Hutchings family treasures found in the Office when it was donated to Historic Madison, Inc. in 1968.

Day 4: Cincinnati, OH

Cincinnati, OH

Amidst the gently rolling hills along the Ohio River, Cincinnati spreads from the southwestern corner of Ohio into Northern Kentucky and Southeastern Indiana. The city is located about mid-point on the shoreline of the 981-mile long Ohio River. John Filson, one of the first settlers in the Ohio Valley community, named it Losantiville, meaning “town opposite the mouth” of the Licking River. The community was the location of Fort Washington, which provided military protection for the surrounding territories. In 1790, General Arthur St. Clair, Commander of Fort Washington, renamed it Cincinnati in honor of the society of Cincinnati, an organization of Revolutionary War officers.

Fountain Square
This iconic fountain is in the heart of Cincinnati, Ohio. Located at the corner of Fifth and Vine Streets, Fountain Square is a public space where Cincinnatians gather, celebrate and connect as a city.

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center
This interactive center is a Smithsonian Institution affiliate, a museum of ideas, a site of conscience, a museum of American history, and museum of African American history. (Admission additional).

Krohn Conservatory
This greenhouse contains multiple floral plants, displayed in the palm house, desert house, the Hinkle Magnolia Garden including a bonsai and orchid displays. Krohn Conservatory was built in 1933 at the height of the Art Deco era. It’s what’s inside those aluminum and glass walls that make Krohn Conservatory truly special. You’d have to travel a good distance from Cincinnati to visit a rainforest or a desert – or come to Krohn Conservatory, Cincinnati Parks’ nationally recognized showcase of more than 3,500 plant species from around the world.

The Eden Park Observation Point
Here, you will view some landmarks within the park including a picturesque gazebo, where a breathtaking view of the city is offered to all of its visitors. This stop is the perfect place for those who love nature and scenery to hop-off.

Cincinnati Art Museum
This impressive museum harbors an unparalleled art collection consisting of more than 60,000 works, spanning over 6,000 years throughout history. It also hosts several national and international traveling exhibitions each year. Today, spend your afternoon exploring the art work from many talented artists from across the world.

Newport on the Levee
Take advantage of this centrally located stop, where many unique boutiques, restaurants, and attractions are within walking distance. Here, find the perfect souvenir to bring back home, grab a bite to eat for lunch, or just enjoy the stunning scenery around the beautiful city of Cincinnati, Ohio!

Reds Hall of Fame and Museum
A place where the story of Reds baseball comes alive each day. Explore the facility and all of its exhibits and discover the history of this iconic Ohio baseball team, including information about the Reds’ best players, historic games, and Hall of Famers. (Admission additional).

Ark Encounters: A Journey of Biblical Proportions

Join us as we depart the docks of the American Queen and set off on a journey of biblical proportions towards a life-size Noah’s Ark! Here, guests will witness time turned back from the modern age into the world of Noah himself, as described in the Old Testament of the Bible.

As we pull into the site, an Ark Encounter representative will board our bus and take the one-mile long journey to the biggest timber-frame structure in the world.

As our destination approaches, a full-scale ark replica stretches across the horizon, offering your first real-life glimpse at this modern engineering marvel, as it is brought from your vivid imagination and into larger-than-life reality. Upon arrival, step out into the shadows of the gargantuan structure and prepare to explore at your leisure.

Spend the afternoon making your way through the 3-story ark, passing more than 132 Ark Bays, which are filled with world-class exhibits. Each one presents thought-evoking topics with state-of-the-art technology and awe-inspiring creations.

Uncover the story of Noah’s life and how this average man was chosen for such a significant task. Discover the animals onboard, represented by life-like, hand-crafted replicas residing in the cargo crates throughout the ark. Discover how the animals were collected, fed, watered, and cared for.

After your personal exploration, make sure to visit Ark Encounter’s vast gift shop and pick up a souvenir to help you remember your time inside this truly spectacular place!

Transportation
Provided
Duration
4.75 hours

Day 5: Maysville, KY

Maysville, KY

Maysville, Kentucky offers picturesque views of the Ohio River as it contrasts to the bustling downtown district. The close-knit community works hard to showcase their heritage and culture. The city is filled with award-winning theaters, local art galleries, museums, and historical landmarks. The small-town charm is sure to delight all visitors as you explore what Maysville has to offer!

Floodwall River Murals
The Maysville Floodwall Mural project began in the summer of 1998. Artist Robert Dafford recreated Maysville’s early river history along the floodwalls, depicting some of the most important historical events. The murals move west from the Limestone entrance, chronologically illustrating four seasons and changes in Mayville’s growth. Other important themes such as the Bison Hunt, Limestone Landing, Lafayette’s Reception, Sutton’s Landing, the Underground Railroad, and Rosemary Clooney, and the Tobacco Scene are all depicted as well.

The Kentucky Gateway Museum
The Kentucky Gateway Museum Center educates visitors by offering dynamic collections, exhibits, and genealogical-historical library. They provide the stories of the Maysville regions as well as shedding light on the people and events of a seven-county area through a collection of books, manuscripts, and documents from the past 300 years.

Washington Opera House
The Washington Opera House had their first performance in September of 1797. A disastrous fire occurred in April, 1850, and destroyed a church that was then known as the Old Blue Church. The Church decided to relocate to another street, and in its place two fire companies and a theatre were built. The Opera House was opened February 12, 1885 with the presentation of ‘Fatinitza’ by the Amy Gordon Opera Company. The Opera House became the center of culture and the community, only to be struck by fire in January, 1898. Once the theatre was restored its name was changed to the Washington Opera House, after the fire company that rebuilt it.

Russell Theatre
Over the past decade, The Russell Theatre Corporation has worked diligently to rescue and stabilize a nostalgic and valuable part of the Maysville community’s history. In 1928, a flamboyant and successful Maysville businessman, Col. J. Barbour Russell announced plans to build such a theater in the small town of Maysville at a cost of $125,000. The Russell Theatre was the result of the exciting period of movie palace theater construction. The theater opened December 4, 1930, amid much fanfare with the showing of "Whoopee", starring Eddie Cantor. Today, the community works hard to preserve this piece of history and keep the theater in pristine condition!

Visitors Welcome Tent
Stop off at the Visitors Welcome Tent, where a local representative will be available to answer any questions you may have regarding the city of Maysville! They can provide you with suggestions on events, attractions, and points of interest, or even help you plan the perfect day based on your interests!

Washington, Kentucky: From Slavery to Freedom

Just a short drive from Maysville, Kentucky sits the quant town of Washington. This 1790’s village, named after Revolutionary War Hero and America’s first President; George Washington, held an important role in history through its pioneer settlers to the slave auctions held within the community. Join us, for a tour of America’s heritage as we walk the flagstone pathways through a town where history was made.

We will begin our historical adventure with a tour through the Paxton House-Visitor’s Center. Built by prominent lawyer and early emancipationist; James Paxton. Then, we’ll explore Mefford’s Ford, an authentic log cabin that contains the same timber from the flatboat that carried George Mefford and his family down the Ohio River in 1785. Next on our historical tour—The Harriet Beecher Stowe Slavery to Freedom Museum; located in the historic 1795 home of local County Clerk, this museum explores the local tradition that Harriet Beecher visited this home in the 1830-40’s and drew upon her experiences as a witness to slavery. This recently updated museum explores the local stories and discusses the realities of slavery. After touring the Harriet Beecher Stowe Museum, guests will visit the Albert Sidney Johnston Home, originally the childhood home of the Civil War Confederate General of the same name and later family home of Union General William “Bull” Nelson. Before heading back to Maysville, we’ll visit the Washington Courthouse Site. Built by master stonemason and Baptist Minister; Lewis Craig in 1793, guests will explore this historic building and learn about its connection to the Slave Trade Industry.

Upon our return to Maysville, guests will explore the Underground Railroad Museum. Known as the Bierbower House, this documented Safe House exhibits artifacts from the days of slavery including memorabilia and documentation on Maysville role in the abolitionist movement and the role of slavery in America.

Transportation
Provided
Duration
4 hours

Day 6: Point Pleasant, WV

Point Pleasant, WV

The town of Point Pleasant, West Virginia is located at the confluence of the Kanawha and Ohio Rivers. Surveyed by a young George Washington for land grants to soldiers for the coming American Revolution, he gave Point Pleasant its name. Nationally known for the Battle of Point Pleasant in 1774, many residents are descendants of those original soldiers and settlers. Founded in 1797, it is one of the oldest towns on the Ohio River. Point Pleasant is home to approximately 5000 residents and boasts over a $1,000,000 in art with murals, statues and paintings of Quilt Squares. The main industry is the transportation and production of coal for electric power for the entire East Coast.

Tu-Endie-Wei State Park
Located on 4 acres at the confluence of the Ohio and Kanawha Rivers, Tu-Endie-Wei State Park means “point between two rivers” in the Wyandotte language. Inside the park is an 84-foot granite monument that commemorates the frontiersmen that lost their lives in the Battle of Point Pleasant. The park also features the Mansion House Museum, which is the oldest and largest log cabin in the Kanawha Valley. It was used as a tavern for many weary frontiersmen, including Daniel Boone and Simon Kenton.

Fort Randolph
Fort Randolph is a replica of the original Fort that stood at the confluence of the Ohio and Kanawha Rivers. Built in 1776, it was protection for the settlers and soldiers from the native tribes. Chief Cornstalk was murdered there and Fort Randolph withstood a siege by the Shawnee and Mingo tribes in retaliation. The Fort features reenactors demonstrating life skills from the 1700s and includes an Officers Cabin, Surveyors Cabin, Blacksmith Shop, Wood Wright/Gun Smith Shop and Hogg’s Tavern. A Trading Post for period souvenirs is also located within the Fort. Available upon request is 1700s period clothing for guests to join the Fort reenactors for the day.

Mothman Museum
Explore the world’s only Mothman Museum, which showcases all the information the small town of Point Pleasant has on the mysterious creature that started terrorizing the town in November of 1966. Read rare historical documents from Mothman eyewitnesses relating their encounters with the monster. View the documentaries, television shows and feature films about Point Pleasant and the Mothman in the Museum Film Room. See why Point Pleasant is the most filmed town in West Virginia. Uncover the truth for yourself!!

Riverfront Park Murals & Tram Tour
The Point Pleasant Riverfront Park not only showcases a gorgeous river view and outdoor amphitheater, but also features artistic “living history” lessons with floodwall murals. Created by artist Robert Dafford, the murals bring local history to life in the form of breathtaking art. Measuring 260 feet long and 15 feet high, the scenes depict many events including the Battle of Point Pleasant. The Riverfront Park Tram Tour takes 30 passengers on a 30-minute tour of 5 local history lessons in high tech sound. The tour also includes the historical stainless-steel statues of Mason County artist Bob Roach.

Day 7: Marietta, OH

Marietta, OH

Marietta's location on two major navigable rivers made it ripe for industry and commerce in the 19th century, with boat building emerging as one of its earliest – a history that is shared at the Ohio River Museum. Oil booms in 1875 and 1910 made investors rich, leading to the construction of lavish houses, many of which still stand.  In 1939, the Sons and Daughters of Pioneer Rivermen, America’s Riverboat Historical Society, was established in Marietta to celebrate the region's substantial river history. Marietta is also home to the Great Mound, or Conus, built by the Mound Builders. The mound was preserved by the original pioneers and is contained within the Mound Cemetery, which is also home to the largest number of Revolutionary War officers buried in one location.

The Mounds
The Mound Cemetery was developed around the base of a prehistoric Adena burial mound known as the Great Mound or Conus in order to preserve it from destruction. In its early years, the Mound Cemetery saw the burial of more than twenty-five Revolutionary War soldiers and has the highest number of burials of officers in the country.
 
The Castle
The Castle was the home of some of Marietta’s most prominent and influential citizens and was the site of grand business, community and family functions throughout Marietta’s history. Only a total of five families have lived on the property between 1808 and 1974 and was later donated to the Betsey Mills Corporation who completed repairs and opened it for tours in 1994. Tour this historical house museum furnished with antiques from the Bosley family and the historical furniture from the other Marietta families who resided in the home.
 
Campus Martius Museum 
Campus Martius Museum was built on the site of the original stockade, built by the Ohio Company between 1788 and 1791. Known by the early settlers as the stockade or Campus Martius, the original fortification was built to house and protect the members of the Ohio Company during the Ohio Indian Wars of 1790 to 1794. By 1795, after the signing of the Treaty of Greeneville, the stockade was no longer necessary and torn down. In 1953, the Ohio Historical Society restored the museum and moved it to the present site of the Ohio Company Land Office. Explore the many exhibits including the Ohio’s First Peoples, Marietta Pioneers and Fort Harmar.
 
Ohio River Museum
This museum features exhibits recounting the history of the Ohio River and the many different types of boats that have been transporting people and cargo for hundreds of years. Three buildings of exhibits focus on the history of the Ohio River and its importance relating to the expansion of our country. The Golden Age of the steamboat recalls the romance and luxury as many people traveled the river in style. The pride of the museum is the W.P. Snyder, Jr., the last of the steam-powered, stern wheeled towboats in the United States and a National Historic Landmark. Docked on the Muskingum River and open for guided tours since 1955, the Snyder takes visitors back to a different era of work boats on the river.
 
Children’s Toy & Doll Museum
Located in the historic Harmar Village of Marietta, this museum features unique dollhouses, teddy bears, dolls, games, stores and offices furnished to their respective periods. They also have antique metal banks and a reproduction carousel horse that represents a gentler time of county fairs on summer nights. Take a step into the past.
 
The Henry Fearing House Museum

The Henry Fearing House was built in 1847 for Henry Fearing, a successful business man who owned and developed property along with interest in a steamboat. He later donated the land for a Woman’s Home.

Day 8: Leisurely River Cruising

Leisurely River Cruising

There is always plenty to do between dawn and dusk on the river and today is the perfect day to enjoy the many public spaces and activities that are available to you onboard. Gaze at the beautiful landscapes and small river towns as you mingle with fellow guests and discuss the unique aspects of river life. If you fancy a moment for yourself, retreat to The Lincoln Library adorned with ornate bookcases stocked with an imaginative selection. Take hold of a literary classic, curl up on a plush chair in a cozy corner and relish every moment of  serenity. Our fitness facility, business center, movie theater and grand lobby offer a more stimulating day on the river for those who wish to indulge in more energy-infused activity. However you wish to spend your day, make it your own and revel in every moment.

Day 9: Pittsburgh, PA

Arrival 8:00 AM
Pittsburgh, PA

Thank you for cruising with us! We hope that you had a memorable experience and look forward to welcoming you aboard in the future. Enjoy Pittsburgh at your leisure or consider a Post-Cruise Premium Shore Excursion with airport transfer.

Post-Cruise: Pittsburgh City Tour

On today’s adventure, we’ll take to the streets of one of America’s favorite travel destinations, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania! This eclectic city, known as the birthplace of Andy Warhol, the hub of culinary hotspots, and a boutique shopping paradise was rated number four on Bazaar’s “17 Best Places to Travel in 2017!” On our driving tour, we will pass through Downtown Pittsburgh, Market Square, the Cultural District, PPG Plaza, Schenley Park, Oakland Neighborhood, which is the location of the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon.

As we wind down Pittsburgh's most iconic streets, we will enjoy a stop at the Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, a green oasis in the middle of this vibrant city, featuring over 15-acres of stunningly manicured grounds, a 14-room glasshouse, and 23 unique gardens, including a renowned orchid and bonsai collection. On this self-guided tour, explore the gardens and exhibits, including the exclusive butterfly exhibit which is sure to amaze.

No trip to Pittsburgh would be complete without a stop at the Cathedral of Learning, which is nestled inside the University of Pittsburgh's beautiful campus. Here we will enjoy a guided tour of the rooms on the first floor which are known as the "Nationality Rooms." These historical rooms each represent a different country by encompassing its own unique history and architectural styles. Our guide will direct us through each country's room including Yugoslavia, Sweden, India, Hungry, and Korea as he discusses the notable cultural achievements and historical figures of each region.

This excursion concludes at the official Post-Cruise Hotel or Airport.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Provided
Duration
4.75 hours