New Orleans to Red Wing (Minneapolis)

Fares from $5,199
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Cruise Summary

AUTHENTIC AMERICA ON THE MIGHTY MISSISSIPPI - Experience the majesty of the mighty Mississippi aboard this entertaining and informative voyage. Storybook American towns and vibrant, bustling cities provide excitement between peaceful fields of gold, majestic panoramas, and high bluffs. Onboard, merriment and wonder abound, with celebrated musical acts such as artist Will Kiefer, who started by playing guitar, but soon added bass, mandolin, piano, and percussion to his musical arsenal. He has shared stages with Al Hirt, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Lee, Moe Bandy, Roger Miller, The Lawrence Welk All Stars, and many more. Or enjoy the tight harmonies, fast picking, smooth sounds, and gritty rhythms of Louisville-based Storefront Congregation, who never fail to send the room’s energy soaring. Esteemed Mark Twain scholar Lewis Hankins brings the revered author to life in an unforgettable one-man show, and you can suspend your disbelief with a mind-boggling performance by Danté, a New Orleans-based magician who mixes intriguing sleight of hand and comedy to make for a fantastic night of entertainment. There is no better way to see America than from the perspective of the river. After cruising amid the charms and gracious style of our iconic American Queen, you will forever be changed.

Theme:
• The Mighty Mississippi: Full-Length Mississippi River Voyage*
 
Included Tours:
• See ports of call below for information on included tours.

Pre-Cruise City Stay Package:
• Begin your journey with an unforgettable 3-day/2-night city stay package. Click Here for full details and package pricing.

Post-Cruise City Stay Package:
• Complete your journey with an unforgettable visit to Lake Itasca, glacier-created birthplace of the Mississippi River. Click Here for full details and package pricing.

*All themed entertainment, events and tours are subject to change without notice.

Itinerary

Vessel: American Queen



Day 1: Hotel Stay - New Orleans, LA

Hotel Stay - New Orleans, LA

Enjoy your complimentary stay at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside. The evening is yours to get self-acquainted with the many treasures of New Orleans. 

Our Hospitality Desk will be located in the hotel for your convenience between 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. It is here that our friendly staff can assist with everything from general questions about your upcoming voyage to reserving Premium Shore Excursions. An American Queen Steamboat Company representative, as well as a local representative, will be readily available to provide you with dining, entertainment, and sight-seeing suggestions so that you may maximize your time in New Orleans.

Day 2: New Orleans, LA

Departure 5:00 PM
New Orleans, LA

Today is the big day! Spend your last day here in the city of New Orleans before embarking on an unforgettable journey!

The official Voyage Check-in will be open between 9:00 AM and 12:00 PM located in the Pre-Cruise Hotel. During this fast and easy procedure, our representatives will arrange your transfer to the vessel and answer any questions you might have. The process is simple and will have you back to exploring in no time and, if you think of any more questions, the Hospitality Desk will be at your service until 3:00 PM, when the complimentary boat transfers will begin!

After you are comfortably aboard the vessel, wave “Au Revoir” to New Orleans as we set off on an incredible adventure up the Mighty Mississippi!

Pre-Cruise: New Orleans Highlights Tour

Embark on an adventure through a city radiating an eccentric and authentic atmosphere and filled to the brim with history and culture close to the heart of America. Explore the history of New Orleans including the first settlers, religion, culture and Mardi Gras. On an exclusive New Orleans narrated driving tour, you will experience the city from an intimate first-person perspective. Relax in the comfort of our motorcoach as we glide past some of the most iconic attractions in the city including the French Quarter, Jackson Square and the Garden District, where elegant mansions stand as a testament to Greek revival, Italianate and Queen Anne Victorian styles.

A stop in Jackson Square will be the perfect location to treat yourself to authentic New Orleans styled lunch at one of the many cafes and eateries or to pick out the perfect souvenir of your visit to this iconic city. Then, we will travel down St. Charles Avenue, along the famous street car line, where New Orleans’ most prestigious and beautiful colleges, Tulane University and Loyola University are located.

Continue the day in New Orleans’ breathtaking City Park, a 400-acre park located in uptown between St. Charles Avenue and the Mississippi River, built on the site of the 1884 World's Fair. Here, we will take a short break to relax and soak in the awe inspiring scenery of “The Big Easy,” as you are treated to a complimentary coffee and a New Orleans’ signature Morning Call beignet. No trip to New Orleans would be complete without a stop at St. Louis Cemetery # 3, known better as the “The City of the Dead,” which is where we will conclude our complete journey through the city of New Orleans!

Note: Our experience ends at the vessel dock.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
5.5 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests
Pre-Cruise: Antebellum Plantation Lunch & Tour with Bayou Swamp Experience

On today’s full adventure, we begin at Houmas House also known as, “The Crown Jewel of Louisiana’s River Road.” This mansion reflects the best parts of each period in its rich history alongside the big bend in the Mississippi River. We will uncover the history of the land grant that was given to the indigenous Houmas Indians who were the first owners of this gorgeous plantation.

Marvel at the free-standing, three story helix staircase which follows the curvature of the adjacent wall as our personal guide escorts us through the mansion. We will see the home’s unique artwork, antique artifacts, and immaculate gardens and grounds before enjoying the culinary traditions of the region with a delicious southern lunch buffet. When your appetite has been satisfied, feel free to explore the home one last time at your leisure or visit the gift shop to pick up that perfect souvenir before we make our way to the 250-acre ecosphere known as the Manchac Swamp.

Upon arrival, prepare to spend the next hour and a half journeying into swamp, through whimsical moss draped cypress trees, as our knowledgeable captain shares information on the lush, exotic vegetation that cover the wetlands, and the creatures who call it home. Because our vessels are exclusive to this river, the swamp critters are accustomed to them, and will emerge at the beckon of the captain’s call! We will also have the chance to get up close and personal with a baby alligator as they come aboard the boat.

Note: While Louisiana’s Manchac Swamp is uniquely beautiful year-round, it is possible that alligators and other native wildlife may not be as active throughout the colder months. Please take this into consideration while booking this tour on dates October through March.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$129 per guest
Duration
8 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 3: Nottoway, LA

Nottoway, LA

Nottoway is the South’s largest, most glorious remaining Antebellum mansion with a rich history dating back to 1859. In a fabulous location along the great River Road overlooking the grand Mississippi River, this “White Castle” of the South transports visitors back to an era of glory and grandeur. Set amongst a natural backdrop of vibrant gardens and two hundred-year-old oak trees, Nottoway Plantation captivates all with a brilliant blend of  true Southern hospitality, history and mystery.

Enjoy an included tour of Nottoway Plantation, the South’s largest remaining antebellum mansion. This stunning historical plantation lies between Baton Rouge and New Orleans and offers a view of a truly grand plantation. The mansion flaunts three-floors, 64-bedrooms, and displays an incredible 22 white square columns which contribute to its’ nickname—“The White Castle of Louisiana.” The most popular room among guests is the White Ballroom, which is painted entirely in white and displays elaborate gold décor throughout. Rooms are trimmed in custom plaster frieze made from Spanish moss, clay, plaster, and mud and are all original to the house. And as if that weren’t enough, this immaculate mansion was constructed with 365 openings—one for each day of the year. Enjoy a guided walking tour of an American Castle as we explore within the pristine walls of Nottoway followed by a stroll through the lush grounds and gardens.

Laura...A Creole Plantation: Nottoway

Our day begins at Laura Plantation, where we will enter the fascinating world of true Louisiana Creoles who, at this historic site, lived apart from the American mainstream for over 200 years. Surrounded by fields of sugarcane and featuring 12 buildings on the National Register, your guided visit takes you through the newly restored Big House, the grounds, the formal French Parterre, the vegetable & fruit gardens, the Banana Land grove and the 170-year-old slave cabins where the west-African folktales of Compair Lapin, known in English as the legendary “Br’er Rabbit,” were recorded.

Laura’s acclaimed tour, named the “Best History Tour in the US,” by Lonely Planet Travel (UK), is based upon personal, compelling accounts found in the French Archives Nationales as well as from Laura Locoul’s own Memories of the Old Plantation Home; of the plantation’s Creole owners, women, slaves and children. Before leaving, be certain to stop in at the Laura Plantation gift shop to pick out the perfect souvenir of this exclusive trip!

To conclude this intimate day of exploration, we make our way back along the levee, towards Nottoway Plantation, known as the “White Castle of Louisiana.” Authentic period dressed guides will meet us upon the front steps, welcoming us to the pristine mansion. Enjoy a guided tour of the plantation, weaving through each room and uncovering the history that lays inside, including a glimpse at the famous White Ballroom! As our tour comes to an end, take advantage of free time to explore the grounds and gift shop at your leisure.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
4 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests
Oak Alley Plantation Tour

Disembark the vessel, as we make our way across the levee, heading through the sugarcane fields, making our way to one of the south’s most prestigious and iconic plantations, Oak Alley Plantation.

A powerful testimony to the rich history of the antebellum south, Oak Alley Plantation invites visitors to explore all facets of her plantation past. This immaculate home was constructed during the height of the sugar industries success in America. The breathtaking Greek-Revival home got its name from the most distinguishing feature, a quarter-mile walkway lined in 300-year-old live oak trees spanning from the levees of the Mississippi River to the entrance of the home. As you explore, discover the history of Jacques and Celina Roman, the plantation owners, whose rich and lavish lifestyle drastically changed over the years they resided in the mansion.

As you make your way around the grounds, make a stop at the authentic slave cabins, gardens, and a blacksmith’s shop, or grab a refreshing mint julep and soak in the scenery which is both breathtaking and overwhelming.

Be certain to explore the Plantation Gift Shop to choose the perfect souvenir of your adventure before we make our way back to the dock of the vessel.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
3.5 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 4: St. Francisville, LA

St. Francisville, LA

Established in 1809, St. Francisville is the oldest town in the Florida Parishes. Below where St. Francisville is located currently, was a settlement called Bayou Sara in the 1790’s. When this settlement was destroyed by flooding and fires, many of the structures and artifacts were hauled up the bluff into St. Francisville, where they are still standing. The town is referred to as “two miles long and two yards wide,” but that definitely doesn’t mean they have nothing to offer! Stop in at one of the unique shops, historical homes, beautiful churches, or breathtaking parks and you will agree. Spanish moss trees grow throughout the town, lending a beautiful southern comfort to the atmosphere.

Royal Street
Take a stroll down Royal Street at any of the shops or just to admire the beautiful trees and homes. Or stop into Grandmother’s Buttons – a unique boutique that offers jewelry made of 100-year-old buttons. Inside the store, you can visit the button museum to learn the history of the business and the inspirations of the art. The store is located inside of a former historic bank lobby with 16-foot ceilings and a bank vault, even if jewelry is not in your plans – the architecture is beautiful!

Old Market Hall
The structure was built in 1819 and has a beautiful open layout. Now, the building is used as a market center for the towns’ local artisans and craftsmen to showcase their products and host their small businesses. Every day is different, you may see anything from jewelry and makeup, scarves and dresses, or snacks and produce!

West Feliciana Historical Society Museum
This museum is dedicated to the history, people, and architectures of West Feliciana Parish. Inside a former hardware store, built in 1896, the Historical Society Museum displays many artifacts, photos, costumes, and articles all portraying the history of St. Francisville. Just across the street, you can stop in one of the fine boutiques and shops!

Grace Episcopal Church
Built in 1860 and rebuilt in 1893 after the Union caused heavy damage in 1863, Grace Episcopal Church stands tall in St. Francisville. Enjoy a self-guided tour of the church and the grounds and make sure to check out the organ located inside – it dates all the way back to 1860! The church is one of the state’s oldest Protestant churches that still stand today.

Redemption & Rehabilitation at Angola Penitentiary

Recognized by the international travel community during the 2014 Seatrade Convention in Barcelona as one of the three most innovative experiences in the world, we embark on a trip full of second chances, rehabilitation, and redemption. Angola Prison—formerly America’s most dangerous penitentiary is known today as a model facility and takes great pride in the faith-based rehabilitation of its inmates, most of whom will never regain their freedom.

Based on your previous perception of prison, you can’t help but get butterflies as you turn to see the yellow gates and barbed wire of Angola Prison. That perception will be changed today. As we wind through Angola’s vast, rich farmland where over five million pounds of produce are harvested by inmates each year, gaze upon the fields that seem to expand forever. Our ride will wind along the tight roads paved through the grounds as we pass inmates hard at work harvesting crops. We push on, passing inmate housing, cattle herds, the K-9 training facility, and the Rodeo arena. Discover the history of this plantation turned penitentiary, made famous for its troubling history and it’s truly inspirational turn-around, annual Rodeo, and numerous sightings in movies including the blockbuster; “Dead Man Walking.”

We will stop in front of the prison’s first and most famous cell block, stepping off the bus for an exclusive tour of the Red Hat Cell Block. Listed on the National Registry of Historic Places, the penitentiary’s first cell block was home to the escape artist Charlie Frazer and was the site of 11 executions by electric chair. Hear the history of the dark places the prison had been to before its unbelievable transformation.

The journey continues, arriving at the penitentiary’s largest chapel where guests will have a once-in-a-lifetime chance to hear the enlightening stories from current inmates and the journey of their transformation into the inspiration and well-rounded people they are today. Our exclusive excursion ends with a stop at the penitentiary’s on-site museum. While here, learn more about the ongoing effort to change prisons in America, the history of Angola and pick up a unique souvenir as a reminder of the ongoing effort to ensure public safety.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$79 per guest
Duration
4 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 5: Natchez, MS

Natchez, MS

This charming river town was first inhabited by Natchez Indians and French explorers who shared the land. It was founded in 1716, making it the oldest city on the Mississippi. The city is known for its elegance, hospitality, and impressive preservation of history – found on every street corner throughout Natchez. Guests will enjoy the unique shops, restaurants, museums, and historical houses located in Natchez, as they explore the beautiful downtown areas.

Rosalie Mansion
In 1716, the French built Fort Rosalie overlooking the Mississippi River. In 1823, a mansion was built by a wealthy cotton planter on land north of the fort. The Mississippi State Society Daughters of the American Revolution have since gained ownership and have been maintaining the house and grounds since 1938. On this self-guided tour, discover the history of the house and the artifacts found throughout. Period-dressed docents can be found throughout the home to answer questions and to provide more information! Guests can explore the extensive gardens, gift shop, library, and carriage as well.

Natchez Visitor’s Center
Enjoy a short, 20-minute video in the Visitor’s Center Theater and hear about the history of Natchez. Then, explore the building at your leisure. At the entrance, a scaled display model of the city is showcased. Stop in the office for some general information and questions about the town and its history, including town highlights and points of interest.

William Johnson House Museum
William Johnson was known as the “Barber of Natchez”; he began as a slave and gained his freedom at age eleven. After his freedom, he began to work his way up in society, eventually becoming almost fully accepted within society. As the town barber, William Johnson was able to hear the stories and gossip of many of the residents, which he documented in his diary for over 16 years. His 3-story brick home was built in 1840 and showcases many original furnishings.

Magnolia Hall
This Greek Revival Mansion was built in 1858. The house was built before the breakout of the Civil War in town but did suffer some damage – a cannon ball was launched into their kitchen! It is now fully restored – the main floor offers a showcase of many antiques and furnishings and the upper floors offer a costume collection located in the Historic Clothing Museum. Tour the house and then stop in the gift shop for some souvenirs.

Stanton Hall
Irish Immigrant and cotton merchant Frederick Stanton built this Palatial Greek Revival mansion in 1857. It was appraised at $83,000 during that period, even before it was furnished. Take a 30-minute tour of the house – which takes up the entire block and is fully furnished. Afterwards you can stop for lunch in the Carriage House Restaurant, known for their fine southern cuisine.

King’s Tavern and Charboneau Distillery
Step off the motorcoach and walk through the front gate leading to the second-floor porch of this 1789 building – the oldest structure in the city of Natchez. Join us for an American Queen exclusive tour of the King’s Tavern – a newly opened restaurant and bar, owned by Regina Charboneau, a nationally known chef, and her husband Doug. Enjoy an exclusive tour of the distillery, followed by a guided tour of the bar, located just next door, with a custom drink on the house.

Natchez Association for the Preservation of Afro-American Culture Museum
Here, learn the history and culture of the African Americans over time. The museum will delve into the 300-year-old African American history, spanning four lifetimes from Colonial and Cotton Kingdom Natchez, to the Reconstruction and the Civil Rights Movements. As you explore this creative portrayal of the true African American story, you will unfold history to reveal Natchez in a light that is shown nowhere else around.

Home Hosted Visit with Ginger and James

The words “Southern hospitality” evoke images of ornate mansions flanked by arched porches and charming ladies offering warm smiles and stories of southern grandeur. Today, we will experience nothing less on this exclusive home-hosted visit to The Towers, one of Mississippi’s grandest and most elegant privately owned antebellum homes. Here, we will be welcomed like old friends by owners Ginger and James Hyland and guided through their personal home. Set on five manicured acres among ancient oaks, The Towers is a stunning estate of exceptional Italianate design with a rich past. 

Silks, antique lace sheers, and magnificent draperies adorn the walls of The Towers, but unlike most historical homes, there are no roped-off rooms here. This is a one-of-a-kind experience where we’ll be free to explore the home as if we were members of the Hyland family. As we relax on the mansion’s back porch, sipping refreshing mint-infused champagne and soaking in the beauty of the perfectly maintained gardens, Ginger will share stories of her star-studded past. Ginger—the daughter of Lawrence A. Hyland, president of Hughes Aircraft Company and one of the men credited with the invention of radar—will share impressive tales of her past growing up in California, including accompanying her parents to Hollywood parties with Howard Hughes, Walter Matthau, and Jack Lemmon. As an adult, Ginger was able to create her own legacy as the first female president of the American Quarter Horse Association.

Ginger is a charismatic host, and will give us an intimate tour of her house, including rare and stunning glimpses of her trinkets and Victorian-era treasures hidden throughout the mansion. Each piece’s story is more interesting than the last. For instance, the set of goblets elegantly placed atop her antique tables were crafted by Ludwig Moser, famous glassware manufacturer for European royalty, while the place mats they rest upon were hand-crafted for Princess Grace. The intricate, original Carrickmacross lace wedding veil on display is an antique version of the one Kate Middleton wore during her extravagant wedding. Ginger and James’ passion for collecting is obvious, as they can recite the history of every piece on display, and welcome all questions with enthusiasm for the stories of the past.

Our tour ends in the sunny, enclosed back gallery, where will enjoy a delightful taste of southern comfort food during a casual, private visit hosted by the Hylands. We’ll get an exclusive taste of Southern flare as we indulge in scrumptious snacks, as we are introduced to Ginger and James’s dear friend Rene Adams (who also happens to be a renowned local chef). Chef Rene will entertain us with stories of the history of food in the Natchez area, including culinary secrets and authentic recipes.

After a champagne toast, our visit will come to an end, as we bid farewell to our new southern friends. Until next time!

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$79 per guest
Duration
2.5 hours
Tour Capacity
36 guests
The Story of Cotton in the Antebellum South

Cross the river to Louisiana and visit historic Frogmore Plantation, designated a “Must See Site” by Rand McNally. Frogmore is the only historic & modern, 1800-acre working cotton plantation in the South. Take a seat on an original pew in an 1800s African American plantation church, as the mistress of Frogmore takes the audience back in time. Music fills the air as the “secret songs” are performed by local musicians. Enjoy the gospel songs and hear the narration about life on a cotton plantation.

Continue the experience exploring authentic slave cabins and cotton fields. Take a walk up to the fields and feel free to pick some cotton for a glimpse of the essence of life on a plantation. We encourage all to explore the historic steam engine cotton gin which the Smithsonian Institute states is the rarest of its kind in existence. After a complimentary beverage in the “Sharecropper Plantation Store,” contrast historical methods. On your return to Natchez, your guide will enlighten you with unusual cotton trivia and answer questions.

A visit to Longwood will complete the “Story of Cotton,” with a glimpse into the devastation caused by war and a changing America. This historic antebellum octagonal mansion is the largest of its shape in America. Also known as “Nutt’s Folly,” this unique mansion remains beautifully unfinished and stands symbolically in representation of the last burst of Southern opulence. A reminder of a time before war brought the cotton baron’s dominance to an end. After surviving decades of neglect and abandonment, Longwood stands strong today and is a can’t miss stop when visiting Natchez.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$79 per guest
Duration
4 hours
Tour Capacity
46 guests
Inside Regina's Kitchen with Celebrity Chef Regina Charboneau

During our visit to Natchez, Mississippi, we will be welcomed into Twin Oaks, a beautiful, southern-style mansion and the personal home of award-winning chef Regina Charboneau. Regina is the author of numerous well-received cookbooks, and is recognized in the culinary world as the personification of southern hospitality. (In fact, she is often complimented for this by none other than Andrew Zimmern.) Regina never ceases to look forward to opening her front door to a limited number of American Queen Steamboat Company guests for intimate culinary experiences around her own dining room table.

Built in 1832, the historic Twin Oaks is a relic of the Antebellum Age of the South. Upon arrival, you'll get a taste of true, down-home hospitality as you're served up delicious southern libations to get nice and cozy before Chef Regina gives a tour of her home, all the while weaving in personal stories of her family and frequent visitors --friends, business colleagues, and celebrities who simply can't get enough of her cooking.

Regina's claim to fame is her much-coveted recipe for picture-perfect, buttery, flaky biscuits. She will share her secrets with you during this very intimate experience. If her southern-style biscuits weren't already enticing enough, Regina serves them on top of her homemade, creamy chicken pot pie. Her ability to take a seemingly simple, traditional dish and elevate it with such finesse never fails to amaze her guests. Not one to be content simply playing the hostess, Regina then invites you into her personal kitchen to get hands-on. You will work with your own dough right alongside her, following this expert's step-by-step instructions to recreate her mouthwatering masterpiece. But it's not all comfort food; you'll get a glimpse into some of Chef Regina's other dishes while at Twin Oaks.

You've never experienced a true southern experience until you spend some time here in Regina's kitchen. There is something about the relaxed atmosphere of Twin Oaks that makes cooking these dishes for yourself, with your own two hands, all the sweeter. Soon, you'll be ready to sample these incredible recipes straight from the oven, fresh, warm, and crispy! Our group of new friends will share some drinks, some pot pie, some laughs --and perhaps even a few surprises --around Regina's dining room table. Not only will you learn Chef Charboneau's inside secrets, but you won't leave her house empty-handed. Regina provides an American Queen Steamboat Company exclusive custom CDs loaded with your new recipes and even a few extras.

Chef Regina Charboneau was born and raised in Natchez, Mississippi. Her culinary success followed the talented chef from Mississippi, to San Francisco, where Regina birthed the idea of “Biscuits & Blues,” which became wildly successful and featured the flavors of her hometown. The nightclub has won multiple WC Handy awards for the Best Blues Club in America. Regina didn't stop there - in 2001, she returned home, where she purchased the historic Twin Oaks Mansion, where she currently resides and continues making strides in the industry. Whether Regina was collaborating as Chef De Cuisine and Culinary Director, sharing her knowledge in her cookbooks, managing and creating menus for her restaurants - including her newest - King's Tavern, or dabbling in the art of rum production with her family at Charboneau Rum Distillery, Regina is sure to bring a piece of the South to the table!

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$129 per guest
Duration
2.5 hours
Tour Capacity
20 guests

Day 6: Vicksburg, MS

Vicksburg, MS

Vicksburg perfectly blends Southern culture and heritage with exciting modern-day attractions. Described as the “Key to the South” by Abraham Lincoln, this southern town carries a history unlike any other Civil War city. Vicksburg was founded in 1811 and grew as a vital river port city. It was a major component to the Civil War and carries much of the history within the town. Today, Vicksburg is a popular spot for tourists to learn about the battles of the city, taste the cuisine, visit the many museums, and pick out the perfect souvenir.

Church of the Holy Trinity
This incredible church spans over 125 feet long, 52 feet wide, and reaches 61 feet high to the apex of the roof. The church was constructed in Romanesque Revival style, finished in red brick, though it showcases zigzag tracery, which was highly unique to the style at the time. The stained-glass windows may be the main draw – there are 26. They were given as memorials and six of them were created by Tiffany Studios in New York under the supervision of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Anchuca Mansion
The word Anchuca derives from an Indian word meaning, “happy home”, which is the exact vibe this home gives off. Built in 1830 by politician J.W. Mauldin, Anchuca is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. During the war, the house was used as a shelter for those who had suffered. Tour the home and its beautiful furnishings.

Old Court House Museum
Now a National Historic Landmark, construction for this colossal courthouse began in 1858 and was completed in just two years in 1860 for $100,000. It survived Union shelling, a direct hit from a tornado in 1953, and is now home to the largest collection of Vicksburg’s history. The museum is filled with countless artifacts, including confederate flags, portraits, the trophy antlers won by steamboat Robert E. Lee in an 1870 race, an original Teddy Bear given by Theodore Roosevelt, and many more!

Yesterday’s Children Antique Doll & Toy Museum
Yesterday’s Children was featured in Southern Living, Delta Magazine, and Dolls Magazine. Enjoy a self-guided tour featuring over 1,000 dolls and toys dating back to 1843.

Biedenharn Coca-Cola™ Museum
At the Biedenharn Coca-Cola™ Museum, enjoy the wide variety of Coca-Cola™ memorabilia in an authentic candy store and soda fountain setting. This building is where Coca-Cola™ was bottled for the first time anywhere in the world in 1894.

Lower Mississippi River Museum
This museum’s mission is to show the federal government’s role in the Mississippi’s past as well as future efforts to maintain a healthy river. Guests can explore showcases of the history of Vicksburg and the region or exhibits about the 1927 flood and how it affected Vicksburg and the Mississippi River. Learn about the fish of the river up close in the museum’s 1,515-gallon aquarium or choose your own adventure on the river with the Mississippi Trail Interactive exhibit!

Old Depot Museum
This museum has a 250-sq ft diorama of the Vicksburg Battlefield. It also houses 250 ship models, model railroads with railroading artifacts, 150 model cars cover the development of the automobile, an architectural display with models depicting the different styles of architecture in Vicksburg, and more than 40 original paintings of war on the river and Civil War artifacts.

On the Front Lines of the Civil War

Travel the front lines of one the most important battlefields in the country. Cross into enemy territory, hear the stories and hardships suffered by soldiers and discover what makes Vicksburg such an important city in American history. Aptly described by President Lincoln as “the key to victory,” the Siege and Battle at Vicksburg is a landmark in time that shaped our country and how wars would forever be fought.

Set off for the historic Vicksburg National Military Park. Here, we will travel the 16-mile road that weaves through the 1,300 monuments and markers. As our luxury motorcoach navigates the bluffs and fields that once served as crucial battlegrounds, we’ll cross both Union and Confederate lines and make a few stops to allow for a close-up experience at some of the key points of interest along the way. Tour the USS Cairo and Museum, an Iron Clad River Boat that was raised from the depths of the Mississippi River and can be boarded and fully explored. Climb the steps at the Illinois State Monument, the largest of the 27 state monuments and walk the National Cemetery, a peaceful location holding the largest amount of Civil War burials in the country, as well as the Vicksburg Battlefield Visitor’s Center where an informative fiber-optic display depicts the progression of the siege.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
4.5 hours
Tour Capacity
150 guests

Day 7: Greenville, MS

Greenville, MS

Greenville is at the very heart and soul of Mississippi Delta. Located on the banks of Lake Fergusson, Greenville is a short drive to Indianola, the birthplace of B.B. King and many other blues singers, so naturally Greenville has its fair share of Blues integrated into its culture. Many authors and writers were born or reside in the small town of Greenville; local legend says that the Greenville water grows writers. The author of the Muppets actually got started here along with a long list of other impressive, renowned writers! The town is also known for their gardening, which they were recognized for growing the largest carpet plant in the nation; and museums of which the town has one for practically everything! This beautiful town is sure to win your heart with its southern charm and soul!

Greenville History Museum
Here, guests can learn about Greenville and all the important events and people she has to offer. The museum is home to many artifacts, photos, memorabilia, and souvenirs dating back to the early 1800s. See personal objects of local past citizens, businesses, or well-known historical present-day celebrities! Greenville History Museum has plenty of information about the Greenville Flood of 1927, including many pictures and stories.

Hebrew Union Temple
This guided, extensive museum about Hebrew history was built in 1906. Located in front of the temple is an original carriage stone - used for passengers as they climbed in and out of horse-drawn carriages in the 19th and early- 20th centuries. The temple showcases original stained glass and an original working organ both from 1906 and extensive artifacts and memorabilia from WWII.

1927 Flood Museum
Located in the oldest structure in Downtown Greenville, the Flood Museum depicts the history of one of the worst natural disasters the county has ever seen. View the flood artifacts and photos illustrating the flood’s impact during the long four months Greenville was flooded. Watch a short documentary illustrating the cause and effects of the Great Flood and the struggle of man against nature.

E.E. Bass Cultural Arts Center
The E.E. Bass Cultural Arts Center is home to the Armitage Herschell Carousel. This carousel was created in 1901 and is the oldest fully functioning Armitage carousel today. Mississippi at that time was still legally segregated, many people approached the owner about having separate nights for carousel rides, but the owner refused, he wished for everyone to ride together. Take a ride on this amazing machine and hear the whistle blow and travel back in time.

Washington County Courthouse
This is the third courthouse to be used by the country. The first courthouse was burned down by Union troops during the Civil War. It was replaced by a second structure that was used until the present courthouse was erected in 1890, made up of primarily Illinois brownstone. The front of the building showcases the Confederate Monument which faces south – like many do in Mississippi. “Guests will be greeted by an expert on the history of this beautiful courthouse.”

Trop Casino
Just a short distance from the dock, guests can find themselves in Greenville’s Trop Casino. The city’s newest addition includes a $6.8- million expansion including a riverboat and land based casino! Enjoy the latest slots and table games or enjoy a fine dining experience at one of the casino’s extraordinary restaurants!

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church
This fine Gothic Revival Church, erected in 1907, is the second building of this parish. It was designed and financed by Father P.J. Korstenbroek, who served at the church for 33 years and was memorialized in William Alexander Percy’s “Lanterns on the Levee”. Many of the stained-glass windows came from the Munich studios of Emi Frei.

Greenville’s Writers Exhibit
Located on the second floor of the William Alexander Percy Memorial Library, the exhibit highlights a number of writers from Greenville. Many of those featured helped to create an extraordinary literary atmosphere in Greenville. Writers who have called the city home have won the Pulitzer Prize, National Book Award and O. Henry Award. Writers influenced by the creative ambiance here include William Alexander Percy (for whom the library is named) Shelby Foote, Walker Percy, Hodding Carter, Jr., Charles Bell, Beverly Lowery, Ellen Douglas, Bern Keating, Julia Reed and David L. Cohn.

Small Towns, Big Legends - The Story of B.B. King

Join us on a journey to Indianola, Mississippi, the hometown of legendary Blues artist, B.B. King. Indianola captures the essence of the grass-root’s Blues and exposes a charmingly simplistic way of life so unique to the Delta region. Each rugged brick used to support this small town has been saturated to its core with the gritty, unrefined soul of “The Blues.”

Despite its modest and unassuming appearance, this humble Delta town birthed a musical giant. Known world-wide as “The King of Blues,” B.B. King called Indianola home for much of his life. Built to tell the story of B.B. King and how the Delta Region shaped his legacy, the B.B. King Museum and Delta Interpretive Center captures the story of the Delta Blues.

On arrival, a guided tour of the museum begins as a heartwarming documentary tells the story of B.B. King’s childhood and early beginnings.

Then, travel back in time as the chronological exhibits throughout the museum twist and wind through the musical journey of the iconic B.B. King, from his humble beginnings as a small child, to a determined young man with a guitar and a dream, through the turning points of his career that cemented his place in musical history.

Spawned in America’s Deep South, the Blues is meant to evoke emotion deep within one’s soul. The Blues must be felt, lived and tasted in order to be fully appreciated. A visit to Club Ebony, an iconic night club built at the end of World War II in 1948 that featured iconic entertainers such as Ray Charles, Count Basie, Bobby Bland, Albert King, and of course – B.B. King, will complete your day. King purchased the venue in 2008 to keep the tradition alive. Here, local Blues performers will entertain with rousing musical prowess while guests enjoy a truly southern snack in all of its rustic and gritty glory. This authentic southern juke joint will set itself apart from the rest of your trip.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.
 

Transportation
Included
Price
$99 per guest
Duration
4.75 hours
Tour Capacity
100 guests

Day 8: Leisurely River Cruising

Leisurely River Cruising

There is always plenty to do between dawn and dusk on the river and today is the perfect day to enjoy the many public spaces and activities that are available to you onboard. Consider booking an indulgent, stress-relieving massage in the American Queen's spa. Browse The Emporium gift shop for that perfect keepsake, or take the time to mingle with fellow guests. 

Day 9: Memphis, TN

Memphis, TN

Enjoy a complimentary city tour of Memphis, Tennessee. During this exclusive narrated driving tour of Memphis, you will see such landmarks like Sun Studio, The Peabody Hotel, National Civil Rights Museum and Beale Street. 

National Civil Rights Museum
Located at the Lorraine Motel, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., chronicles key episodes of the American Civil and human rights efforts globally, through collections, exhibitions, and educational programs (Admission Additional)

Memphis Rock ‘N’ Soul Museum
See the complete story of Memphis music history, as researched by the Smithsonian Institution. This museum tells of the musical pioneers and legends of all racial and sodo-economical backgrounds who, for the love of music, overcame obstacles to create musical sound that changed the world.

Beale Street
Beale Street is a significant location in the city’s history as well as in the history of the blues. Step into the center for Southern Folklore, a non-profit organization that show cases and celebrates the culture- the foods, the music, the arts, the traditions, and the stories of the South.

Auto Zone Park & Peabody Hotel
Auto Zone Park is home of the minor league baseball team, the Memphis Redbirds. The Peabody Hotel is a luxury hotel in Downtown Memphis. Well known for the famous “Peabody Ducks” the hotel rooftop, but make a daily trek at 11:00 AM to the hotel’s lobby in a “March of Ducks” celebration.

Sun Studios
A recording studio opened by rock pioneer Sam Phillips. It is widely known as the birthplace of Rock & Roll. Blues and R&B artists like Howlin’ Wolf, junior Parker, Little Milton, B.B. King, James Cotton, Rufus Thomas, and Rosco Gordon recorded there in the early 1950’s (Admission Additional).

Mud Island Monorail, Walkway and River Park
Don’t miss the opportunity to experience great views of downtown, Memphis, the Mississippi River and Mud Island River Park. Swiss-made monorail or use the walkway across the harbor to Mud Island River Park. (Admission Additional).

The Elvis Experience

Includes an all-access pass to Graceland, a guided tour through Memphis and a walk on Beale Street!

Enhance Mississippi River journey with a special tour throughout the streets of Memphis and on to the home of the King himself - Graceland Mansion!

Enter through “The King's” front door where the presence of Elvis can still be felt within the walls as you walk through the same rooms as he did after a long day's performance. Custom crafted and state-of-the art iPads will help guide your way through each room, providing thoughtful narration by actor and Elvis enthusiast, John Stamos as well as personal commentary by Elvis' daughter, Lisa Marie Presley.

At this musical mecca, discover distinctly “Elvis” rooms such as the famous “Jungle Room,” an homage to “The King's” love for Hawaii, featuring green shagged carpets, exotically carved woodwork, and a Polynesian feel. View “Vernon's Office,” where Elvis' father, Vernon Presley, managed his career, as well as the Trophy Building and Racquetball Building, where you will find hundreds of awards and accolades, received throughout his career as well as those awarded posthumously. Just outside the mansion, a short stroll through the Meditation Garden, where “The King's” final resting place is located alongside other members of his family. Pay your respects to Elvis and his contributions to American music and entertainment, knowing his legacy resonates throughout the world and spans multiple generations.

But the adventure doesn't end there! This Elvis experience continues with exclusive exhibits including: 

• Graceland Mansion Audio-Guided Tour with New Orientation Film 

• Full Access to State-of-the-Art Visitor Entertainment Complex - NEW! 

• Elvis' Two Custom Airplanes 

• Elvis Presley Car Museum - NEW! 

• Elvis: The Entertainer Career Showcase Museum - NEW! 

• Elvis Discover Exhibits - NEW!

The journey continues with Graceland in our rearview and Memphis's heart and soul - Beale Street ahead. Oozing with the gritty feeling of the blues and rock `n' roll, Beale Street's musical history is alive in every store front lining the road, street band performing on the corner, and brick paving our way. A larger-than-life iconic brass statue of Elvis marks the starting point of the “Walking in Memphis” portion of this exclusive excursion. Here, we will experience the most famous street in Memphis as our local guide leads us through the vibrant city he calls home. Our personal and exclusive guide shares his infectious enthusiasm and love for this southern city as he narrates stories of his favorite attractions as we walk past. A stroll along Beale Street is littered with music, history, culture and the sweet smell of smoky barbeque wafting through the alleys.

You will not want to miss this exclusive experience through the Music City!

Transportation
Included
Price
$129 per guest
Duration
6.25 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 10: Leisurely River Cruising

Leisurely River Cruising

There is always plenty to do between dawn and dusk on the river and today is the perfect day to enjoy the many public spaces and activities that are available to you onboard. Consider booking an indulgent, stress-relieving massage in the American Queen's spa. Browse The Emporium gift shop for that perfect keepsake, or take the time to mingle with fellow guests. 

Day 11: New Madrid, MO

New Madrid, MO

New Madrid was founded in 1776 by Spanish Governor Esteban Rodríguez Miró who welcomed Anglo-Saxon settlers but required them to become citizens of Spain and live under the guidance of his appointed impresario, Revolutionary War veteran, Colonel William Morgan of New Jersey. Some 2,000 settled in the region. In 1800, Spain traded the territory to France in the Third Treaty of San Ildefonso, and France promptly sold it to the United States as part of Louisiana Purchase. The city is remembered as being the nearby location for the Mississippi River military engagement, the Battle of Island Number Ten, during the Civil War. The city is famous for being the site of a series of more than 1,000 earthquakes in 1811-1812, caused by what is called the New Madrid Seismic Zone. Today, explore this quaint river town that will appeal to all guests.

New Madrid Historical Museum
Located in the former Kendall Saloon off of Main Street, the New Madrid Historical Museum shares the history of this river town from the Mississippian period through the 20th century. Here, guests can explore the great earthquakes of 1811 and 1812, documented with seismographic recordings, Native American artifacts, Civil War artifacts, early family life in the city of New Madrid during the 19th and 20th centuries and the gift shop!

New Madrid County Courthouse
In 1812 New Madrid was a vast county extending south through much of Arkansas. The area was cut roughly in half during the following year, and even further reductions came by 1816. New Madrid County, located by the Mississippi, was one of Missouri’s earliest counties. The town of New Madrid was founded in 1783, and the county was organized in 1812. First courts met in New Madrid, but county records previous to 1816 are missing. After the devastating earthquake of 1811 and repeated flooding of the Mississippi, the court chose an inland site for the county seat. For the 20th century courthouse, New Madrid County purchased a new site north of the original town in March 1915. From architects who presented plans, the court selected those from H. G. Clymer of St. Louis. Clymer's plan was for a brick building 107 by 75 feet with stone trim. Additional funds for finishing the courthouse and jail were authorized early in 1917, but no bids were received. World War I was beginning, and the labor force was reduced. Finally, W. W. Taylor, a master builder from Cape Girardeau, superintended final interior work, which was completed in January 1919. Final costs exceeded $100,000. This courthouse continues in use as New Madrid's seat of justice.

Hunter-Dawson State Historic Site
Hunter-Dawson State Historic Site preserves a now-vanished part of Missouri: The stately Bootheel Mansion. Filled with original pieces and furnished in the style similar to its heydays of the 1860s-1880s, this ornate mansion provides a history lesson in every corner. Most of the original furniture, purchased by the house’s first owners, Amanda and William Hunter, are still in the house today.

Higgerson School
Restored to the one-room school that operated at Higgerson Landing in 1948, the Higgerson School is a window to the educational practices that shaped and served rural America from the early 19th century. Experience the typical school day of children attending all eight grades in one room with one teacher. Relive the days of playing “Wolf Over and River” and “Caterpillars,” a trip to the outdoor facility and crossing the fence on the stile. Visit Higgerson Landing Gift Shop before heading to your next stop.

River Walk Gallery
The oldest home in New Madrid, the Hart-Stepp House was built by Abraham Augustine in 1840 and moved to its present location in order to escape the encroaching waters of the Mississippi River. It is now home to the River Walk Gallery and the New Madrid Chamber of Commerce. The Gallery features the works of local photographer and artists.

Day 12: Paducah, KY

Paducah, KY

Paducah embraces their harmonious history between the European settlers and the Padoucca Indians native to the area. The city is located at the confluence of the Ohio and the Tennessee Rivers and because of this, it is often called the Four-Rivers Area due to the proximity of the Ohio, Cumberland, Tennessee, and Mississippi Rivers. This prime location has played a major role in Paducah’s history, as transportation was easily accessible – the economy was strong and travelers were frequent!

National Quilt Museum
Celebrating 25 years in 2016, The National Quilt Museum is the largest of its kind in the world. It is the portal to the contemporary quilt experience - exhibits and workshops by renowned quilters who are implementing creative approaches to fiber art. The 27,000-square-foot contemporary structure features three galleries highlighting a collection of contemporary quilts and changing thematic exhibitions that celebrate the talent and diversity of the global quilting community. Workshops taught by world-class fiber art instructors are offered year-round. The Museum Shop & Book Store offers Kentucky Crafted items and quilt-related instructional and collector books.

Lloyd Tilghman House
This historic Greek Revival house was built in 1852 for Lloyd Tilghman, a new member of Paducah’s community at the time. After the house was completed, Tilghman did not purchase the property. Instead, the builder, Robert Woolfolk became the sole owner of the house and grounds. Tilghman, his wife, their seven children, and five slaves resided in the home until 1861. It was then that Woolfolk and his family moved into the home. Their family was pro-South and proudly flew a Confederate flag causing many uproars in the community and with the Federal Troops who located their headquarters just across the street from the home. Eventually Woolfolk and his family were banished from Paducah and the United States, forced to live in Canada on August 1, 1864.

Paducah Railroad Museum
The original Freight House (across the parking lot from the Museum) was built in 1925 by the Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis Railway. In 1996, the Freight House was sold and the Museum moved to a building one-half block away. Here, learn the history of the railroad and those who used it, explore the authentic train models, and enjoy the memorabilia showcased for guests.

River Discovery Center
In 1988 Mayor Gerry Montgomery and her committee pursued the development of a museum to showcase the Four Rivers Region’s maritime heritage. The River Heritage Center was planned in 1992 as the very beginning stages of the mayor’s dream. Years later the museum was relocated by Seamen’s Church Institute of New York and renamed the River Heritage Museum before finally receiving its current name, the River Discovery Center in 2008. Here explore artifacts, exhibits, and interactive displays that share the history of marine life and the history of the river. Trail Interactive exhibit

The Moonshine Company
Explore, taste, and purchase traditional and international award winning Kentucky moonshine and moonshine flavors at The Moonshine Company in historic downtown Paducah. Located only blocks from the confluence of the Ohio and Tennessee Rivers, The Moonshine Company offers complimentary guided museum tours and moonshine samples that are distilled on-site in our 108-year-old building. Get a glimpse into the rich Kentucky moonshine history with their collection of historic moonshine stills and purchase that same moonshine secretly produced and bootlegged by our family over 80 years ago to bring home with you!

Check-in Along the Chitlin' Trail

The year is 1915 and America is disjointed by segregation and heavily governed by Jim Crow Laws. In the heart of the country sat Paducah, Kentucky, a quaint, yet bustling city on the Chitlin’ Trail. Deemed one of the very few safe and acceptable areas for African American entertainers to perform in the early to mid-1900s, the Chitlin’ Trail saw hundreds of musicians as they made the journey from New Orleans to Chicago leaving traces of jazz, blues and soul in their wake.

A rustic colonial structure adorned with simple white lettering across the front porch reading, “Hotel Metropolitan” became a safe haven for these traveling musicians. Step into the radiating heat of the Kentucky sun and meet Miss Maggie, a ball of southern energy and hospitality, as she opens the door to this historical hotel … time turns back a century. Miss Maggie used her undeniable determination and willpower to establish this much needed “colored” hotel in 1909, an almost unfathomable task for a black woman at the time.

Follow Miss Maggie through the rooms as she shares the rich history this hotel has stowed in its walls. Listen as she gossips about its past boarders, including B.B. King, Billie Holiday, Ike and Tina Turner, just to name a few in the hotel’s famous guest book. If you listen closely, you can almost hear the laughter and music reverberating through the halls of the old hotel, billowing out into the streets of Paducah and enveloping the neighborhood.

The Hotel Metropolitan, “The Respectable Place to Stay Since 1909,” is a project of Save America’s Treasures, a US government initiative created in 1998 to preserve and protect historic buildings, arts, and published works.

Note: This tour is not handicapped accessible.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

 

Transportation
Included
Price
$49 per guest
Duration
1.5 hours
Tour Capacity
16 guests

Day 13: Cape Girardeau, MO

Cape Girardeau, MO

Nestled along the western banks of the mighty Mississippi River lays the city of Cape Girardeau, Missouri. It’s a community rich in history and heritage. For more than 250 years, people have been drawn to Cape Girardeau and the river on which it lies. Stroll along the riverfront, where the passion that led Mark Twain to write so eloquently about Cape Girardeau in Life on the Mississippi, the inspiration that Gen. Ulysses S. Grant used to lead with firm conviction as he took command of the Union Army in the historic downtown, and the warmth and hospitality that community founder Louis Lorimier extended to Lewis and Clark while on the journey of a lifetime as they set forth on their Corps of Discovery to explore the Louisiana Purchase will be prominent.

Mississippi River Tales Murals
The Mississippi River Tales Mural is the largest and most dramatic of Cape Girardeau’s murals and is located on a portion of the downtown floodwall. Covering nearly 18,000 square feet, this 1,100-foot-long mural features 24 historically-themed panels that vividly portray Cape Girardeau’s rich history and heritage; descriptive markers provide an explanation of each panel. The Missouri Wall of Fame Mural features 47 individuals who were born in Missouri or achieved fame while living in the state.

Red House Interpretive Center
The Center commemorates the life of community founder French-Canadian, Louis Lorimier, as well as the visit of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark in November, 1803. The Interpretive Center houses an early 1800s exhibit that reflects the lives of the early settlers of the old Cape Girardeau district. In addition, a rendering of Lorimier’s Trading Post displays authentic items that would have been sold at the turn of the 19th century. The gardens on the north side of the house show the types of garden you might have seen in 1803 with flowers, vegetables, cooking herbs, and medicinal herbs.

Old St. Vincent’s Church
The Renaissance architecture, referred to as English Gothic Revival style, is not only beautiful but also extremely rare, as very few churches of this style exist in America today. Explore the many artifacts preserved in the church as you admire the arches and woodwork lining the interior of the chapel. Discover this fully restored beauty as it transports you back in time.

Glenn House
Completed in 1883, the Glenn house is a fully restored historic museum in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. It is a prime example of the Victorian period lifestyle including the architecture, furnishings, clothing, and décor. The Glenn House was built for David A. Glenn, who was an influential figure in the city’s history. He and his family occupied the home until 1915. Before they vacated the home, it was renovated in 1900 to the Queen Anne Style. The house is listed on the National Register of Historical Places. Many of the furnishings and features of the home have been restored to their original beauty and have been kept authentic to the Victorian time interior.

Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts River Campus
Earl and Margie Holland School of Visual and Performing Arts is composed of departments covering the history and science of art, music, theater, and dance. Visit the beautiful campus and explore the unique styles and subjects taught here. Walk around and discover impressive pieces of art, in many different styles, showcasing the talent and hard work of local students.

Crisp Museum
The Crisp Museum collects in three thematic areas: archaeology, history, and fine art. The Archaeology collection has several collections of prehistoric Native American artifacts, which illustrate aspects of the daily and ceremonial lives of the indigenous peoples who lived in southeastern Missouri from 13,500 B.C. to 1400 A.D., highlighting some very rare and exotic artifacts. The museum’s historical collections cover a wide range of artifacts with strengths in the areas of militaria, firearms and their accessories, clothing, and hand tools.

Cape River Heritage Museum
Since its founding in 1981, the Cape River Heritage Museum has focused on local history while preserving a historic building at the corner of Frederick and Independence streets. Located in an old fire house, the museum offers events, tours, and exhibits on steamboats, education, commerce, the Missouri mule, the state flag, the Show-Me slogan, Native American culture, and fire and police memorabilia. Snap a picture of yourself in the model steamboat or in the cab of a tall-ladder fire truck from the 1950s!

Tracing the Trail of Tears

Embark on a journey through history and discover the roots of America’s melting pot on a full-immersion cultural expedition. Re-trace the route taken by displaced Native American’s on the Trail of Tears and witness the quaintness of the American “Main Street” on an American Duchess exclusive historic tour.
 
Our first stop brings us to the Trail of Tears State Park in Jackson, Missouri. With 3,415 acres of pristine scenery, the Trail of Tears State Park blends beautiful countryside and untouched landscapes with one of the most devastating events of Native American history. The park memorializes the devastating effects of the relocation of the Cherokee nation from east of the Mississippi River to present-day Oklahoma in 1838 and 1839. The tribe journeyed through the land on an agonizing journey that resulted in starvation, death and heartache and was so dubbed the “Trail of Tears.” Explore the Visitor’s Center for an in-depth understanding of this American tragedy as a powerful documentary traces the events of this cultural banishment. 
 
A visit to the Bollinger Mill Historic Site gives us the chance to travel back to simpler days when businesses in Missouri were fueled by streams rushing over a dam and bridges were covered. Visitors to Bollinger Mill State Historic Site can learn how wheat and corn were ground into flour and meal in the massive four-story mill that dates to the Civil War era.
 
Our experience continues to the nearby town of Jackson, Missouri. Discover the history of this city on a narrated tour before arriving to the Jackson Heritage Museum, located along the quaint streets of this mid-western American town and the ideal location to complete our cultural exploration. Displays with artifacts of historical significance showcase different backgrounds, heritages, and ethnicities that have all combined to create unique communities and America’s melting pot.  If shopping is what you prefer to do, feel free to head out into town, where you can take advantage of the boutique shopping opportunities of Jackson before heading back to the American Duchess!

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$59 per guest
Duration
4.5 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 14: Chester, IL

Chester, IL

Known as the “Home of Popeye”, Chester, Illinois is a city rich in history and pop culture. Because creator and writer of Popeye, Elzie Crisler Segar, was born here, the famous characters starred in the show will be seen showcased frequently throughout the town. Stop at the Popeye Character Trail to view granite statues of the characters overlooking the Mississippi or check out America’s only Popeye museum and gift shop to take home a souvenir to remind you of your visit to Chester! Spend the day exploring the unique history as you walk through luxurious homes, historical buildings, and museums!

Cohen Memorial Home
Dubbed by Mark Twain “the house with the blue windows,” this historical home overlooks the Mississippi River from high atop the bluffs. Guests are welcome to tour the historic home and its original furnishings. The Cohen Home is a beautiful historical site located on Harrison Street overlooking the Mississippi River. Its unusual blue storm windows make it a very visible landmark for boats on the river and travelers approaching the Chester Bridge from Missouri. Built in 1855, it was the home of the William Cohen family who lived there until 1983. The upstairs’ bedrooms contain furnishings and collections from several families of Chester including the Cohen family.

The Spinach Can Collectibles and Museum
Located in the old Opera House Antiques where the creator of Popeye, Elzie Segar worked. Today, the Spinach Can serves as the international headquarters for the Popeye Fan Club and store for everything Popeye. Also at this stop, Pinky’s Sugarland, a small historic building which is now a specialty shop for cake pops, cupcakes, cakes and handmade greeting cards. As the only Popeye collectables store and museum in America, this small shop located in Downtown Chester will surely bring back memories of the past as you explore. Walk around the front to see original and rare collectables featuring Popeye, Olive Oyl, Wimpy, Bluto, Swee’Pen, Eugene the Jeep, and much more. Pick out the perfect unique book, toy, video, postcard, poster, or other memorabilia for someone back home or to keep for yourself. Then head into the back to see some rare and highly sought after Popeye collectables.

The Courthouse and Randolph County Museum
Here guests can enjoy an outstanding 360-degree view of the Mississippi River, Missouri farmlands and Chester alongside Olive Oyl and Swee’Pea. Also here, guests can tour the 1864 Annex Museum. This stone Gothic structure museum contains artifacts that display the rich history of the early French settlers. The museum houses permanent displays as well as some artifacts that are temporarily on loan, and it hosts shows and exhibits which showcase specific treasures from the heritage and the long history of Randolph County. In addition, the newly established archives room will enable the museum to properly preserve and store documents, photographs, and other non-displayed artifacts for generations to come. Explore the history of Randolph County through collections of paintings, articles, photos, and artifacts that depict their past.

Welcome Center
The Chester Welcome Center offers a lookout point which gives a fantastic vantage point to observe the majestic Mississippi River below. You won’t miss this building as a large statue of the iconic Popeye cast in bronze marks its location along the Chester streets. The Chester Welcome Center is located in Segar Park next to the Chester Bridge overlooking the Mississippi River. The new Welcome Center contains restrooms, an information center with displays and a large deck overlooking the Mississippi River and Missouri Bottoms. The bronze statue of Popeye the Sailor Man has been overlooking the Mississippi River in Segar Park for more than 30 years. This is the first of numerous Popeye & Friends Character Trail statues of Popeye characters placed in various areas in Chester.

Ste. Genevieve...Missouri's Oldest European Settlement

Step back in time and into the fascinating world of an authentic 18th-century French colony and witness the charming antiquity that has been historically preserved. As we set off, watch out the windows of the motorcoach and discover some of the hidden treasures the city of Chester has to offer. Hear about the city that was shaped by the imagination of one artist.

We will then make our way to the historic town of Ste. Genevieve, Missouri’s oldest European settlement. Amaze at some of the city’s most rustic structures featuring rare architectural styles lining the streets just waiting for their stories to be told, as you hear the history of this incredibly historic town with roots dating back to 1722.

A visit to the Welcome Center will help us to fill in the gaps of our Ste. Genevieve history knowledge in a friendly, interactive environment. Then, at Ste. Genevieve Church, built in the late 1890’s, tour this historic sanctuary lined with stunning stained glass windows and historic artifacts while enjoying a live organ concert performed by a local organist. Explore the Ste. Genevieve’s historic downtown Landmark District, where you are free to visit the shops and art galleries within the French-Creole style buildings that line the streets. Complete this historical tour at the Bolduc House Museum. Step into a different time as we experience the French Colony lifestyle prior to the Louisiana Purchase as period re-enactors perform 18th-century activities at this National Historic Landmark.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
4.5 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 15: St. Louis, MO

St. Louis, MO

Enjoy a complimentary city tour of St. Louis, Missouri. Famously referred to as the “Gateway City,” St. Louis is known for its diverse neighborhoods and the different cultures and traditions each one brings forth. The iconic city was founded in 1764 by French explorers who settled on the east side of the Mississippi, claiming the land as their fur trading post. In 1803, the city’s name began to spread as the beginning point for the famous Louis and Clark Expedition. The city is typically associated with its 630-foot stainless steel monument, The Gateway Arch, which stands proud on the banks of the Mississippi River to symbolize the westward expansion of the United States.

Driving Tour of St. Louis
Enjoy a narrated driving tour of St. Louis that will include all the major sights including a stop to take a photo of the Gateway Arch!

Day 16: Alton, IL

Alton, IL

In its early days, Alton was a bustling river town, much larger than Chicago. Alton was built on industry - flour mills, quarries, brick making, pottery making - and relied on the Mississippi River. The “Steamboat Era” played an important role of the growth of Alton, and riverboat traffic can still be seen from the riverfront up and down the Mighty Mississippi River

Audubon Center at Riverlands
Guests can view an ever-changing variety of songbirds and waterfowl at The Audubon Center at Riverlands. This unique attraction connects people to the beauty and significance of the Mississippi River. View bald eagles and herons as you experience the magnificent views of the quiet waters of Ellis Bay.

Alton Visitor Center
Stop at the Visitor’s Center and Mercantile Shop to learn more about the area and pick up a unique souvenir. Uncover the history of this American city and gather information on the best places to visit during your stay. Guests can then cross the street and explore the boutiques and shops with their eclectic collections!.

Piasa Bird
The Piasa Bird is a local legend in the Alton area. Its founding’s go back to 1673 when Father Jacques Marquette, in recording his famous journey down the Mississippi River with Louis Joliet, described the “Piasa” as a birdlike monster painted high on the bluffs along the Mississippi River, where the city of Alton, Illinois now stands. View the Piasa Bird and learn the tail of this Native American Mystical creature that is painted along the cliffs of Alton.

Jacoby Arts Center
The Jacoby Arts Center is a beacon in downtown Alton, attracting community interest and art lovers from across the country. Housed in the renovated 1899 Jacoby furniture store on Broadway this three-story, 40,000-squarefoot brick building was donated to the Madison County Arts Council by C. J. Jacoby and Co., Inc. and opened as an art center in 2004. In this new facility you will find a sparkling art gallery, a dynamic educational facility, and an array of exquisite artisans’ crafts.

Broadway Stop
Hop-off at this Central Alton stop, where you will find an array of activities to explore at your leisure. Choose to spend your afternoon shopping at the unique boutiques, treat yourself to a delicious lunch at one of the local eateries, or stroll along the street and admire the historic buildings and the stories they have to tell. As you make your way through town, discover why Alton is often referred to as one of the Most Haunted Towns in America.

Living History of Alton, Illinois

Walk in the footsteps of President Abraham Lincoln as guests are invited to explore his early career in Alton. We will experience all of the key locations that launched the career of this political giant. Guests can stand on the river banks in the exact location that Abraham Lincoln stood face to face with James Shields while preparing to duel in 1842. Experience the broad and ever-lasting effects the War Between the States had on this area as we stand in the midst of the ruins left behind by the Civil War as it touched this river community in the 1860s.

In addition to the seven incredibly interesting Lincoln & Civil War sites, this experience will also include the statue of Robert Wadlow, the World’s tallest man. Stand next to him and compare yourself to this 8 foot, 11 inch giant of Alton! Then, enjoy Piasa Park, where guests can hear the history of the Piasa Bird or read the story off of a large granite arrowhead with engravings – Learn about Chief Ouatoga and how they fought this legendary bird. Get a picture of the giant Piasa Bird mural painted on the side of the bluff before we conclude this incredible day!

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$59 per guest
Duration
3.75 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 17: Hannibal, MO

Hannibal, MO

Hannibal, Missouri has a rich history, diverse industrial economy, and truly remarkable arts. The city was founded in 1819 by Moses D. Bates and became a popular stop along the river for many steamboats traveling up the Mississippi River. Hannibal offers more parks per citizens than most towns in the Midwest and was included in the famous “50 Miles of Art.” Today, the most popular draw of this quirky town is Hannibal’s very own Samuel Langhorne Clemens, recognized world-wide as Mark Twain. Many of the popular characters featured in Twain’s novels were based on people Clemens had known while growing up in Hannibal. Many of the characters and influences of this American icon are weaved into the streets, shops, restaurants, and museums of Hannibal waiting to be uncovered.

Big River Train Town
This Hannibal gem is packed with more toy trains than you have probably ever seen. Enjoy authentic replicas as they move swiftly along the tracks or learn the history of the models and the trains they are made after. As you walk around, relive your childhood and learn the stories of the railways’ past as you view some authentic memorabilia.

The Mark Twain Boyhood Home & Museum
This included tour visits seven buildings, five of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and two that are highly interactive museums showcasing fifteen original Norman Rockwell paintings! Learn about the Hannibal of Samuel Clemens’s childhood and explore the stories created through the powerful imagination of American icon, Mark Twain. Building 1: Interpretive Center – Here, explore interactive exhibits highlighting the stories and life of Samuel Clemens. Building 2: Mark Twain’s Boyhood Home & Garden – See the home where Clemens was raised, and where the adventures of Tom Sawyer took place, along with the home’s lovely gardens. Building 3: Boyhood Home Gift Shop – The original museum, which was built in 1937, now houses a gift shop offering Twain’s books. Building 4: Huckleberry Finn House – The childhood home of Tom Blankenship, the model for Huck Finn. Building 5: Becky Thatcher House – The home of Laura Hawkins, the inspiration for Becky. Building 6: J.M. Clemens Justice of the Peace Office – The location where Sam’s father held court. Building 7: Mark Twain Museum Gallery – This lovely two-story building features interactive exhibits, the Norman Rockwell Gallery, and treasured Clemens family artifacts. Live performances occur throughout the day at specific times. Tom & Huck Statue – Located at the foot of Cardiff Hill and offering a perfect location for a photo!

Trinity Episcopal Church
For more than 150 years, the Sanctuary of Trinity Episcopal Church, designed by architect Joseph A. Miller, has stood the test of time. With an interior consisting of a deeply arched heavy wooden beamed ceiling, beautiful bronze lanterns and side wall lamps, an impressive pipe organ and 18 illustriously conceived stained glass windows, Trinity Church is truly a historic marvel. As you step into the church, you are immediately transported back into time and enveloped by Hannibal’s past. Early church members commissioned well-known artists to design the Sanctuary’s beautiful stained glass windows. With signature designs by Charles Booth, Emil Frei, Jr. and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Glass Company, these windows are truly remarkable in their diverse artistic style, thematic construction and conceptual execution.

Cave Hollow West Winery
A fun place to meet other people ad relax while enjoying local wine, beer and light snacks such as cheese and crackers! 

Karlocks Kars and Pop Culture Museum
Take a self-guided tour through Hannibal’s newest attraction! There is over 10,000 Square feet of artifacts which allow you to relive historic, pop culture moments. This museum also features over a dozen vintage cars, arcade games, 100’s of signs & posters, movie props jukeboxes and so much more! 

Hannibal History Museum 
Through interactive exhibits, artifacts and historic photos, the Hannibal History Museum tells the story of Hannibal’s remarkable past with exhibits including the founding of Hannibal which showcases how the New Madrid Earthquake and the failed settlement of Marion City affected the fledgling river town of Hannibal. Other exhibits include Antebellum Hannibal, Hannibal’s Civil War,  the Lumber Barons, The 20th Century Industry, The Art of Architecture, the Prominent Hannibalians and so much more!

Mississippi Mud...A Hands-on Experience

Prepare yourself for a day of creativity and expression as we set out for the working studio at Ayer’s Pottery. As you enter this quaint and quirky shop, take in the organic, earthy aroma that radiates from each rustic brick lining the walls of the gallery. Walk the perimeter of the gallery, appreciating unique, hand-crafted pottery pieces ranging in different sizes, shapes, and textures.

Admire the delicate and fragile ceramic shapes that were created by the molding and forming of professional potter, Steve Ayers. His unique and absolutely stunning pieces are recognized nationwide for their particularly rich colored glazes. Get a personal demonstration of this artisan as he works his hands into the clay and produce one-of-a-kind art, look around at all of Ayer’s masterpieces – all of which are fully functional and contain no lead and is both dishwasher and microwave safe!

Then, get ready to suit up and give it a try for yourself! Head down to the workshop, and become an artist, spinning your very own potter’s wheel as you try out some of the techniques you watched during the demonstration. Feel your mind drift into serenity as you press your thumbs into the cool, damp clay, molding a piece of art into your very own souvenir. Project your creative mind and personality into a masterpiece that will then be fired up and shipped to your home as a perfect and unique keepsake of your Hannibal adventure! Protective apron/suit will be provided, but keep in mind that creativity can be messy business! Let your creative juices flow! Please note in advance that in order to proceed to the workshop, guests will need to be able to travel down a 16-step flight of steps comfortably.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
1.5 hours
Tour Capacity
6 guests
Muddy River Radio's Live Rendition of "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"

In the early 1900s, a groundbreaking invention changed household entertainment. Step back in time to an era before television, the internet and social media – the Golden Age of Radio. With the invention of the radio, for the first time in history, Americans could receive timely information, sometimes up to the minute, an unfathomable concept at the time.

With the introduction of radios in most households around the country, the entertainment industry began to explode like an uncontainable, vibrant wildfire which swept across the nation, enticing listeners from coast to coast. Sounds of swing music, smooth jazz, presidential addresses, and globalized news reports became the anthem of our country. Perhaps the most popular and captivating, though, were the contemporary sounds of live radio theatre productions, which prompted families to gather around the radio and, for a moment, forget the worries of everyday live in the early 1900s.

Join us as we journey into the heart of Hannibal, Missouri, hometown of American icon Mark Twain. Arrive at the Mark Twain Museum Gallery, where, surrounded by artifacts from Twain’s illustrious career, you will experience one of Twain’s novels brought to life by the talented actors of the Muddy River Radio Theater group. From moving monologues to sound effects, everything will be performed live, right in front of your eyes! See for yourself how live radio would have been recorded in the Golden Age of Radio and be swept away by one of Twain’s most beloved stories.

The group will take the stage and offer a nostalgic present for our guests with their rendition of America’s famous novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This entirely acoustic performance will showcase the power of sound to recreate a story near and dear to the Mississippi region. Enjoy Muddy River Radio’s masterful interpretation, alluring your imagination to run wild as Tom and his gang are brought to life!

Do not miss out on this exclusive opportunity to celebrate the Mississippi region and an era that has faded into our history books!

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$59 per guest
Duration
1.75 hours
Tour Capacity
32-64 guests

Day 18: Leisurely River Cruising

Leisurely River Cruising

Relax on deck with a copy of Huckleberry Finn or another imaginative selection borrowed from our revered Mark Twain Gallery, enjoy some quiet time in the Ladies' Tea Parlor, or recruit your fellow guests for an exciting board game in our Gentelmen's Card Room. 

Day 19: Clinton, IA

Clinton, IA

The city of Clinton has much to offer, all with the beautiful backdrop of the Mississippi River. Situated at the crossroads of the Lincoln Highway and the Great River Road, Clinton is the Eastern-most point in the state of Iowa. At the height of its local economy during the late 19th Century, Clinton was regarded as the lumber capital of the nation; a history that is reflected as visitors pass many old sawmills. Today, agriculture plays a big part in Clinton’s economy, which is visible in the beautiful rolling fields filled with luscious, fresh harvest crops. Explore the history of this fascinating river town and discover a lifestyle that will stand out from today’s norm!

Windmill Cultural Center
The Windmill Cultural Center was dedicated in April 2010 and show- cases 23 model windmills and the variety of tasks they are able to perform. The windmills represent mills found in 10 European countries: Belgium, Denmark, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Portugal, and the Netherlands. Three of the models are motorized, and the windmills vary in size from tabletop to 6’ tall. The different backgrounds of the windmills give each its own design, which demonstrates the evolution of windmills throughout the years. Located inside the Windmill Cultural Center is a charming gift shop where unique gifts, such as Delft pottery, windmill souvenirs, and De Immigrant stone-ground flour may be purchased.

De Immigrant Windmill
This impressive, authentic Dutch windmill stands 90 feet tall on the dike in Fulton, Illinois. The new windmill was built specifically for Fulton in Heiligerlee, the Netherlands. Dutch millwrights built the structure, took it apart, shipped the pieces to the United States, and traveled to Fulton several times to reassemble the structure. It was dedicated at the annual Dutch Days festival in May 2000. The windmill stands proudly along the banks of the Mississippi River to honor the local Dutch heritage. It is fully operational, using the sails to run millstones to grind grain. The windmill employs a set of blue basalt millstones to produce flour from wheat, rye, corn, buckwheat, and flaxseed. Stone-ground flours are produced at the windmill and sold at the Windmill Cultural Center gift shop. Volunteer Millers guide guests through the interior of the windmill where they are able to admire the craftsmanship of this incredible Fulton landmark.

Sawmill Museum
Lumber was an essential resource in the city of Clinton, not only for the construction of buildings and barns, but also for its contribution to the industry that brought with it the railroad, the immigrants, and the entrepreneurs. Hear the buzz of the sawmill as logs are cut into lumber and envision the workings of the Struve Mill where hundreds of pieces of wood became beautiful trims, doors, and flooring. Experience what life was really like in a lumber camp and explore the authentic sawmill equipment throughout the museum. Then, watch in amazement as four famous Clinton lumber barons come back to life to share the story of how they put the city of Clinton on the map as one of the world’s largest producers of lumber!

George M. Curtis Mansion
This restored Victorian home of lumber baron George M. Curtis is a prime example of period architecture with its original Tiffany glass windows, delicately carved banisters, ornate wood trim, and massive fireplaces. Rich in the history of the area, this mansion makes an elegant backdrop for special events. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The tour of the Mansion will end with a sampling of local Wide River Wines on the wrap-around front porch.

Clinton County Historical Museum & Library
Since its establishment in 1964, the Clinton County Historical Society Museum has established a collection of artifacts from Clinton County. The museum has an impressive collection of the work of local artisans. Exhibits and galleries take up two floors of the building and display local art, artifacts and history, antique musical instruments, and much more. After exploring the fascinating and interactive museum floors, gusts can stop into the gift shop, where an assortment of local historical books, prints, and souvenirs can be purchased! Trail Interactive exhibit!

Clinton County Courthouse
The Clinton County Courthouse was first originally erected in 1869 with a total cost of only $3,200. For three years, the building was furnished to the county at no charge, then rented from stockholders and eventually purchased by the county at approximately three-fourths of its original cost. The courthouse was soon outgrown in 1878 and another building was built just west of the courthouse to house some of the countries offices. On March 15, 1892 the new courthouse you see today was built our of granite and red Indian Pipestone from Minnesota.

The John Deere Experience

Discover a true American success story as you learn the legacy behind one of America’s Agricultural giants. We will begin the tour with a trip to the John Deere Harvester Work Factory. This experience will be a favorite for guests of all interests! Learn how John Deere has adapted to the agricultural and economical changes to remain a main producer in the industry. Gaze in awe at the gargantuan machinery as a guide explains each one’s purpose and its evolution while navigating through the factory in the comfort of a tram.

Conclude the day at the John Deere Pavilion where we will see both modern-day and concept machines displayed in their working environments, hear stories about owners and operators as they describe a typical workday and learn about how John Deere equipment has changed their work and helped shape the land. Explore the innovative and refreshing displays on how the industry is pushing for cleaner, more efficient machinery and production. The best part – guests actually have the chance to climb into the seats of the massive machinery and discover the changes and features of both old and new tractors on a hands-on experience unlike ever before! You will have the opportunity to feel the power of a John Deere in action as excavators crawl through simulators in this full sensory tour experience.

All guests must wear long pants and full shoes that cover both the toes and heel. Sandals and open toe shoes are not permitted.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Note: Please keep in mind that due to changes in the factory’s schedules, tours are subject to change which might result in cancellation.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
4.5 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests
Uncovering the Hidden Treasures of LeClaire, Iowa

Perfectly situated along the bend of the Mighty Mississippi River, the city of LeClaire is one of Iowa’s most beautiful hidden treasures. Begin with a journey through the charming streets of this river town and uncover the history and culture intertwined as our local expert sheds light on the most iconic buildings and attractions LeClaire has to offer.

Prepare to begin a fascinating day of exploration as we uncover one of LeClaire’s most prized possessions, the Lone Star Wooden Hull Steam-Powered Paddle Wheel, the very first licensed riverboat pilot on the Mississippi which has been dry docked and displayed directly in the center of a two-story museum for guests to explore from the inside out! Then, explore even more hidden treasures held within the Buffalo Bill Museum, featuring the life of local and nationwide frontiersmen, pilots, engineers, and musicians and their valuable contributions to the evolution of America!

If you have spare time, head across the street and explore LeClaire’s more than ideal downtown shopping district! Weave your way in and out of unique boutiques and shops offering anything from antiques or home décor to trendy clothing and eccentric souvenirs! Grab a quick bite at one of the many eateries before heading to our final destination!

Continue the adventure at the Antique Archeology Shop located just downtown, better known as the home base location for History Channel sensation, “American Pickers.” Browse the impressive selection of quirky and original merchandise and even make an offer!

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$49 per guest
Duration
3.75 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 20: Dubuque, IA

Dubuque, IA

One of the few large cities in Iowa with hills, Dubuque is an extremely popular tourist destination, featuring unique architecture and desirable river location. From the America’s River Project in the Port of Dubuque that transformed the riverfront, to the revitalization of the historic Main Street, the ongoing evolution of the Historic Millwork District downtown, and the impressive and expansive westward growth, Dubuque remains a remarkable city along the Mississippi. Intelligent Community Forum named Dubuque as one of just five U.S. cities as a “Smart21 Community” in 2015 and the National Civic League has named Dubuque as a top All-American City three times in just six years! Guests will surely enjoy exploring this beautiful and unique city as they uncover the history and advancements held within.

St. Luke’s United Methodist Church
This beautiful Romanesque style church is characterized by thick walls, heavy columns and round arches for windows and doors. On foundations 32 inches thick, the walls are built of enduring Bedford limestone from Indiana. Each stone was cut by hand and if one looks carefully, imbedded fossils may be seen. Inside, the original organ from 1897 has been restored and is once again functioning, murals are displayed, and impressive wood-work. The church is most noted for its large collection of Tiffany stained glass windows, which have been called, “one of the five finest Religious Tiffany Collections in the world.” Explore the history and art of the church as an expert guide leads guests through the expansive church explaining some of the most interesting facts.

Dubuque Museum of Art
The Dubuque Museum of Art is the oldest cultural institution in the State of Iowa and was founded over 140 years ago as the Dubuque Art Association. Inside is a permanent collection of over 2,200 works concentrating on 20th-century American art with an emphasis on American Regionalism and artists connected to the Tri-State area. This includes works by Grant Wood, Arthur Geisert, and the complete collection of Edward S. Curtis’ The North American Indian, which is also part of a traveling exhibition program. 

The Fenelon Place Elevator
The Fenelon Place Elevator is described as the world’s shortest, steepest scenic railway, 296 feet in length, elevating passengers 189 feet from Fourth Street to Fenelon Place. The railway was constructed in 1882 for the private use by a wealthy local banker and former state senator, J.K. Graves. See a view of the historic Dubuque business district, the river and three states.

Hotel Julien Dubuque
The original structure, four stories high, was called the Waples House and was named after its owner, Peter Waples, a wealthy Dubuque merchant. It was the first building visible to the travelers entering Dubuque from across the Mississippi. The Waples House was furnished extravagantly and was known far and wide for its gourmet cuisine. Now, over 100 years later, after a $33 plus million interior renovation and exterior restoration, Hotel Julien Dubuque has redefined elegance through the blending of its rich history with modern luxury and style.

Grand Opera House
Dubuque’s historic Grand Opera House is the oldest and grandest of more than 16 legitimate theaters that served the community prior to 1900. In 1889, W.L. Bradley, Jr. and other local businessmen invested $100,000 to create this iconic landmark. The architect, Willoughby Edbrooke, selected the Richardsonian Romanesque style and chose red sandstone and Dubuque brick for construction. The 1,100 seat auditorium included 2 balconies, 8 boxes and stalls, and a proscenium large enough to host major theatrical productions. Today, the theater is still used by the community and the productions continue to amaze guests.

Galena, Illinois Including the Home of General Ulysses S. Grant

Unwind as we travel to the beautiful town of Galena, nestled in the rolling hills of Northwest Illinois, enchanting visitors with incredible historic sites and attractions, wonderful specialty shops and unlimited dining options. As you lounge in the comfort of the motorcoach, gaze out on some of Galena’s hidden treasures as they fill the frames of your windows. Admire the pristine architecture of the historical Desoto House Hotel, a functioning hotel constructed in 1855 and named the “Largest Hotel in the West,” as we pass the Old Market House, discover Galena’s community life dating back to 1845, and stare in awe at the pristine 1857 Italianate architecture visible at Galena’s Belvedere Mansion. As our ride comes to a stop, look out the window to see another Italianate-styled brick house – the home of General Ulysses S. Grant! During the Civil War, Galena gave the Union Army nine generals including Ulysses S. Grant, who later became the 18th President of the United States. Admire this fully restored historical home in its authentic 1868 glory as you explore original Grant family furnishings and memorabilia!

The rest of your day in Galena is spent at your leisure. Take all the time needed exploring the remarkable exhibits that dig further into the stories of historical legend, Ulysses S. Grant at the U.S. Grant Museum. After you have seen everything that interests you, use the remaining time to take a short walk to Downtown Galena, a must-stop for shopping lovers. The shopping district offers some of the most quirky and unique boutiques and shops that you can explore, making sure to pick up a memento of your time in this historic town. Downtown Galena harbors many distinctive handcrafted souvenirs, cafés with their own spin on a “cup of joe,” and antique shops creating an atmosphere reminiscent of “Main Street USA.” You will not want to miss out on this exciting adventure through the streets of Galena!

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
4.5 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 21: La Crosse, WI

La Crosse, WI

Named by explorer Zebulon Pike, who saw a group of people playing a game with sticks that looked like a cross, La Crosse is now a popular tourist stop. Filled with statues, architecture, and an exquisite view of the river, this river city is an artist’s dream. Like much of Wisconsin, La Crosse became heavily involved with the lumber industry in the mid-1800s until the decline of the forests throughout much of Wisconsin took its toll. But in the wake of the vanishing lumber era, La Crosse became a city renowned for its beer making, with around five breweries operating in La Crosse near the turn of the century. Today, make note of lingering pieces of history along the streets of the city, inside local breweries, and within the floorboards of historic homes and businesses.

Dahl Auto Museum
The Dahl Auto Museum celebrates the Dahl family’s involvement as automotive dealers spanning over 100 years and five generations. It also features the history of the automobile through the eyes of the Ford Motor Company, an extensive mascot collection and many beautifully restored classic automobiles from the turn of the century to present. Approximately 20 antique and classic cars are on display to highlight each decade from Dahl Automotive’s inception in 1911. To incorporate historic La Crosse, the museum also features a re-creation of the Starlite Drive-in eatre.

Chapels of St. Rose
The shape of this immense and beautiful chapel symbolizes attributes of God. The high ceilings represent a God who transcends the finite world while the shape of the nave, transepts and sanctuary form a cross, acknowledging an immanent God who has been with humankind even through suffering and death. At the entrance of the chapel, just above the door, a relief of Moses before the burning bush is showcased. Admire bronzed statues, symbolic paintings and sculptures, stained glass windows and mosaics.

Hixon House
This beautiful Victorian house is filled with nearly all of the original furnishings, making it stand out from many other historical homes. The construction of the home began in 1858 by lumber baron Gideon Hixon, who featured beautiful woodwork and ornate interior decoration. His wife, Ellen, is responsible for the decoration of the home, who chose the late Victorian/Edwardian style, accenting rooms with “Turkish Nooks.” It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Riverside Museum
Riverside Museum exhibits chronicle the history of La Crosse, concentrating on the Mississippi River and its importance to the area. Exhibits range from prehistoric artifacts and cave drawings to logging, rafting, and the Pearl Button Process. A large collection of artifacts from the steamboat “War Eagle” are on display and a PBS Video about La Crosse is shown.

Winona Revealed: The Midwest's Best Kept Secret

Including a narrated city tour, a ride on the Winona Tour Boat, and admission to Winona County History Center and Minnesota Marine Art Museum.

Begin the day at Winona County History Center, where exhibits will showcase an era where the bluffs were just being formed and the area was a booming lumber town. An impressive display of Native American artifacts, presidential memorabilia, and many more treasures are also waiting to be discovered here before we head to our next destination!

Then, discover a new aspect of the region with an intimate river experience aboard the Cal Fremling, our sleek, 1.4 million dollar, 60-foot boat named after the late Cal Fremling, a former Winona State University biology professor and river enthusiast. Experience the Mississippi River as our expert WSU tour guide covers river refuge history, aquatic life, and the river’s local environmental impacts, making sure to point out wildlife, vegetation, and scenery.

Soak in the beauty of the river from a closer perspective. Appreciate the simplicity of nature within the Mississippi River and along the river banks, a refreshing contrast to the hustle and bustle of everyday life. After our captain navigates us back to shore, we will make our way back to the vessel.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
2.5 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests

Day 22: Red Wing, MN

Red Wing, MN

Red Wing, Minnesota was included on National Geographic Traveler’s list of most historic places in the world. Discovered in the early 1850’s, the lands were used mostly for harvesting wheat that would be transported on the river. Later in Red Wing’s history the economy began to flourish with the pottery industry, which became a main source of income between 1877 and 1967. Today, the city offers endless opportunities to travel back in time and learn about settlers and travelers that occupied the land before today, or to admire the craftsmanship and creativity of local artisans of both the present and the past.

Aliveo Military Museum
The Aliveo Military Museum has a significant collection of military artifacts such as edged weapons, flags, badges and much more! They have a vast collection that includes artifacts and relics from all major wars from the Revolutionary War to the current Middle-East Wars. They believe in education about our military history through preservation, protention and presentation of the military artifacts themselves.

Red Wing Marine Museum
The Red Wing Marine Museum is in one of the city’s historical venues along the river near boathouse village and depicts one of the oldest manufacturing indus- tries-the boat and motor business. It sits very near the site of the original factory where Red Wing-made boats and motors were made and launched. e museum exhibits include more than 30 restored Red Wing orobred marine engines, outboard motors and a display of fishing tackle, photographs, documents and other river-related items. The significance of the building is such that in 1885, this limestone building was constructed as the Red Wing Waterworks. e plant used steam power to intake water from the Mississippi River, it went through a fourteen-inch cast iron intake pipe, wells and two filters before it was pumped into the street mains and a reservoir atop Sorin’s Bluff (Memorial Park). Seven miles of water mains then distributed water throughout the city. is building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places and received an Award of Merit from the Heritage Preservation Committee in 2014 for the work done to preserve this significantly historic asset in the city.

Pottery Museum of Red Wing
Nearly 6000 unique pieces of stoneware, art pottery, and dinnerware await you at the Pottery Museum of Red Wing. Spanning 90 years of production, from 1877-1967, these artifacts tell the dynamic and colorful story of this Mississippi River town. Using nature’s elements of earth, fire, and water, the pottery artisans created a local legacy known throughout the world. Come and view nearly 100 years of history and tradition, beautifully displayed for your enjoyment.

St. James Hotel
This beautiful and historic hotel opened on Thanksgiving Day in 1875, drawing in many businessmen who wished for first-class lodging in the wheat-trading center of the world. The St. James Hotel became an immediate sensation, cementing its name as the hub of activity in Red Wing nearly overnight. Located just a few steps from the Red Wing train depot and steam boating docks, St. James was booked to full capacity each night. Inside, wealthy travelers and businessmen alike marveled at the stunning four-story Italianate structure filled with elegant furnishings, Brussels carpets, English velvet carpets, steam heat, hot and cold running water, gas on every floor, and a state-of-the-art kitchen! Today, the hotel is owned by the Red Wing Shoe Company and continues to flaunt pristine elegance in each and every detail, just as it has for the past 140 years. While visiting, discover the history of Clara Nelson, St. James’ historical waitress hired in 1914. It wasn’t long after she was hired that she learned she had much more talent than even she knew, as she slowly began to gain control of the kitchen, claiming her position within the hotel and shaping its history with features and traditions that are still seen here today.

On Eagle's Wings

Set out for the oldest city along the Upper Mississippi River, Wabasha, Minnesota, first winding through the streets of an iconic river town, Red Wing. Admire the rustic brick buildings, daunting bluffs opening up the Mississippi River, and quirky artwork that lines the streets along the way.

Notice the buildings along the road aging as we enter Wabasha, overflowing with history and culture. Prepare yourself for an unforgettable “nose to beak” experience as we arrive at the National Eagle Center. Spend the day discovering the US national symbol of freedom – the American bald eagle! Get up close and personal to these regal creatures unlike ever before as trained professionals supervise a room full of golden eagles.

Watch in awe as birds with wingspans reaching close to 8 feet soar through the sky, swooping gracefully through the wind currents. Follow the majestic creatures outside to learn why this area is known as America’s Eagle Destination, as you search the horizon for eagles in their natural setting atop the observation deck above the Mississippi River. The overlook is the perfect location for bird watching and when you finally catch sight of these incredible and powerful birds soaring over the currents of the Mighty Mississippi River, you will truly understand the meaning and beauty of the Freedom it proudly represents!

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
4 hours
Tour Capacity
75 guests
Hidden Waters of the Mississippi: A Scenic Kayak Tour

On this exclusive scenic experience, take to the waters as we embark on an adventure along the winding waters, into the vibrant heart of the natural and rich ecosystem of the Mississippi River Valley. Nature will be at our fingertips as we glide by waving green banks, beneath the swooping wings of eagles, and atop sky blue waters in your personal kayak.

Our journey will begin as we push off the banks of the Ole Miss Marina Colvill Park into the smooth currents of the Mississippi River. Guided by a team of talented naturalists and expert kayak navigators, we will begin on a leisurely paddle tour through the hidden and scenic waters of the river. Enjoy narrations and insight about the surrounding landscapes and take in the views of the river from a fresh perspective.

Continue paddling in the shadows of the legendary and towering Barn Bluff, an impressive 400-foot cliff which has served as a visual reference for river explorers throughout history. We will then travel away from the main channel, along twisted and secretive waters, until the monumental views of Lake Pepin, the largest lake on the Mississippi River come into sight.

Amaze at the biodiversity of the region and take advantage of this exclusive opportunity to engage in conversation with nature experts about the river’s ecosystem and the native wildlife found grazing along the banks, hidden among the trees, and swimming beneath our kayaks. Life jackets, personal kayaks, and paddles will all be provided.

Please note: there is a maximum weight limit of 300 pounds.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$99 per guest
Duration
3 hours
Tour Capacity
7 guests

Day 23: Red Wing, MN

Arrival 8:00 AM
Red Wing, MN

Thank you for cruising with us! We hope that you had a memorable experience and look forward to welcoming you aboard in the future. Enjoy nearby Minneapolis at your leisure or consider a Post-Cruise Premium Shore Excursion with airport transfer.

Post-Cruise: St. Paul City Tour

Today, discover the rich history of Minnesota’s bustling, energetic capital, St. Paul. Uncover some of the city’s many mysteries as you learn why the city has been divided into two cities, rather than one, why the state capital rooted its home here, and the reasons behind the names “Minneapolis” and “St. Paul.”

At Minnehaha Falls, breathe in the fresh air as the breeze blows a shimmering mist across your cheeks. Watch the fresh water pour off the slick sheets of rock at the top of the cliffs, powerfully funneling into the small body of water located below. At the Minneapolis Stone Arch Bridge admire the beauty of the architectural link that contrasts the metallic structures of the urbane city with the natural glimmer of the Mississippi waters. Watch as the Mississippi rapids channel towards Saint Anthony Falls downstream before visiting the restored Harriet Island Regional Park with its paddlewheel riverboats.

Watch the city unfold through the windows of the motorcoach as we pass some of the most historical treasures of the city including Fort Snelling, St. Paul Cathedral, the Minnesota State Capitol building, the new Guthrie Theater, and Historic Summit Avenue lined in pristine Victorian architecture.

Note: This tour ends at the Minneapolis- St. Paul International Airport or Post-Cruise Hotel. (Please book flights after 2:00 PM.) 

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Included
Price
$69 per guest
Duration
5 hours
Tour Capacity
50 guests