Vancouver, WA Roundtrip (Portland, OR)

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Cruise Summary

WELCOME TO THE MAGNIFICENT PACIFIC NORTHWEST - This voyage through the Pacific Northwest shows you the bounty and beauty of nature, as well as the history and heritage of the people who inhabited this diverse region. The Cascade Range separates the dense forests of the coastal regions of Washington and Oregon from the arid rolling hills and wine country the Red Mountain region. You will experience both climates on this voyage sailing west via the scenic Columbia River Gorge, the only break in the Cascades between British Columbia and Southern Oregon. At each port, you can embrace the culture and history of this region on an included shore excursion. 


Included Tours:
• See ports of call below for information on included tours.

Premium Shore Excursions:
• See ports of call below for the options available to you. Click Here to learn more and to place reservations.

*All themed entertainment, events and tours are subject to change without notice. 

Itinerary

Vessel: American Empress



Day 1: Hotel Stay - Vancouver, WA (Portland, OR)

Hotel Stay - Vancouver, WA (Portland, OR)

Day 2: Vancouver, WA (Portland, OR)

Departure 6:00 PM
Vancouver, WA (Portland, OR)

Today is the big day! Spend a few hours before your departure exploring the beautiful city of Vancouver. 

If you didn’t have a chance to check-in on the first night, the hospitality desk will be open today between 8:30 AM and 12:00 PM at the official Pre-Cruise hotel. During the easy check-in procedure, representatives will arrange your transfer to the vessel and answer questions regarding your upcoming voyage. The process is simple and will have you back to exploring or relaxing in no time. If you think of additional questions, the hospitality staff will be at your service until the transfers begin to take you to the American Empress.

Day 3: The Dalles, OR

The Dalles, OR

At the end of the overland Oregon Trail, The Dalles holds a unique place in history as a jumping-off spot for pioneers, soldiers, gold miners, adventurers, gun-slingers, floozies, and scallywags. Lewis and Clark camped at this location at Rock Fort Camp during their historic journey in 1805 and 1806. Fort Dalles was established in 1850. Oregon Trail pioneers ended their overland journey at The Dalles, forced to build rafts and take the “river road” west to Fort Vancouver, then into the Willamette River valley. Ten thousand years of Native American trading took place on the banks of the Columbia River, shaped by the Ice Age Missoula floods. The town was located at the foot of a series of dangerous rapids which the Hudson’s Bay Company fur traders called “The Dalles of the Columbia.”

Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Museum
Enjoy the beautiful, paved walking trails, a pond, and scenic overlooks. The Discovery Center is located in a beautiful and unique ecosystem native to the area. The multimedia, interactive museum inspires appreciation and stewardship of the natural and cultural treasures of the gorge and Wasco County. Exhibits focus on the volcanic upheaval and raging floods that shaped the gorge, the unique flora and fauna of the region, and 11,000 years of cultural history. In addition to touring the many fascinating exhibits, visitors can spend time viewing the museum’s incredible Raptor Program, with live birds of prey presented daily or take the pond walk and view the native plants.

Original Wasco County Courthouse Museum
In 1854, The Dalles was designated by the Territorial Legislature as the county seat of one of the largest counties ever formed in the United States. Wasco County extended from the crest of the Cascade Mountains to the Great Divide in the Rockies and encompassed 130,000 square miles. Construction began in 1858, under the supervision of Judge Orlando Humason, who was the first county judge and also the chairman of the Board of Commissioners. This small courthouse was used as a public meeting place, church services, as well as the seat of law for the county.

The Dalles Area Chamber of Commerce
Discover the history of this historic and beautiful city. Use this opportunity to learn about the many attractions and buildings, and get a listing of the best places to grab a bite to eat, get a fine glass of wine, find a pharmacy, or do the most unique shopping. The friendly hosts will assist you in any way possible while informing you about their hometown.

Fort Dalles Museum
Located in the former fort’s Surgeon’s Quarters built in 1856, the Fort Dalles Museum opened in 1905, making it one of Oregon’s oldest history museums. Take a tour of the unique collection of pioneer and military artifacts at one of the old west’s most pivotal places in history. Enjoy walking on the grounds of this military fort and viewing the historic collection of wagons and antique vehicles. The collection holds over 30 wheeled vehicles, including a stage coach, road-building equipment, a covered wagon, two horse-drawn hearses, the Umatille House bus, and a surrey once owned by Oregon’s seventh governor, Zenas Ferry Moody. Explore the hand-hewn log buildings of the Anderson Homestead, including the pioneer house, granary, and barn.

Downtown Shopping
The Dalles Commercial Historic District was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. Spend the day exploring this city’s extraordinary boutiques, exquisite cuisine, and beautiful historic structures. Walk the streets of this peaceful and quirky river-town and admire the intricate murals that line the walls and streets of The Dalles. A multitude of murals wrap around the city, depicting important moments in their history.

Vintage America: Classic Planes, Automobiles, Antiques & More!

Today’s tour takes guests back in time. A time when flight was a novelty rather than a daily mode of transportation and when the automobile required a crank and power steering was almost a century away.

Embark on an exclusive tour to the Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum, also known as the WAAAM. Enjoy a guided tour of this facility offering an extensive collection of over 130 antique cars and hangers full of meticulously restored aeroplanes from as far back as 1917. Available exclusively to American Empress guests, enjoy an included tour of the restoration work shop where these antique modes of transportation are brought back to life. The pilots take these tributes to America’s history to the air as often as they can and proudly maintain them in full working order.

Uncover the story of young Silas Christofferson and his monumental flight off the top of the 12-story Multnomah Hotel in 1912 in his handmade plane and then get a first-hand look at that very plane. Explore the collection of Model T’s, Studebakers, the 1914 Detroit Electric, Harley Davidsons, military vehicles and so much more! Want to test out their capabilities? Guests will be able to ride around the property in an authentic Model T!

After taking a step back in time you will have the opportunity to do some shopping in the downtown Hood River area. This bustling shopping district features historic buildings, boutiques, designer shops, outdoor adventure gear outfitters, antique shops, art galleries and more than 30 restaurants. There is something for everyone!

Vintage America with Optional Private Plane Ride Enhancement
Enjoy the full tour of the Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum, as outlined above, but with an added twist—a private ride in a Cessna aircraft over Mt. Hood! Your 40 minute private ride is guided by a fully qualified pilot and includes up-close views of Mt. Hood, glimpses of Mt. Adams, Mt. Rainer and on a clear day you’ll get a birds-eyeview of Mt. Saint Helens. Price: $299 per guest. Restrictions: Tour operated with a minimum of 2 passengers and a maximum of 3 per plane

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Provided
Price
Standard: $69 per guest | Enhanced: $299 per guest
Duration
3.5 hours

Day 4: Portland, OR

Portland, OR

The “City of Roses” is an eclectic blend of art galleries, coffee shops, museums and farm-to-table restaurants with a spirited vibe. Marvel at the beauty of more than 8,000 roses at the International Rose Test Garden. Or spend the day discovering nature’s boundless power at nearby Mount St. Helens.

Limited Edition Excursion: Vintages of the Willamette Valley
Travel through the scenic country roads of Washington County, as we prepare for a wine-tasting tour at one of the Willamette Valley’s most prestigious and recognized wineries and vineyards! Guests will enjoy two of the following wineries:

Duck Pond Cellars - A top-producing Oregon winery that has, despite their success, remained a closely-knit, family-owned business. Relax on the deck under the sunshine, soaking in the beauty of the surrounding vineyard and polished gardens, and hear about the family’s production techniques as you indulge in the flavors of their finest wines.

Four Graces – This winery is named for the four daughters of the Black family who originally purchased an existing vineyard in the Dundee Hills of the Willamette Valley. The family winery is located on beautiful, sustainably-farmed vineyards and produces wines that are internationally renowned for their balance, elegance, complexity, and richness.

Stoller Family Estate – This local winery was established in 1943 and converting to a vineyard fifty years later. Today, they are the largest contiguous vineyard in Oregon’s Dundee Hills, and their fruit is 100% estate grown. They control every step of the process, from pruning to bottling and everything in between. The result is award-winning wines that are balanced, complex, and consistently exceptional.

Erath Winery – Erath wines are an expression of the land that the winery has cultivated for more than 40 years, longer than any other winery in the Dundee Hills of Oregon. As a tribute to the fertile lands of the Willamette Valley, savor classic Oregon Pinot and enjoy the sweeping views of the picturesque Jory hills of the Pacific Northwest landscapes.

Day 5: Astoria, OR

Astoria, OR

Astoria is known to be the oldest American Settlement west of the Rocky Mountains. For thousands of years, Clatsop Indians inhabited the lands that are now known as Astoria. In 1805, Lewis and Clark led their expedition through the town and spent the winter at Fort Clatsop. In 1813, a British warship sailed into the Columbia River, gaining possession of the city and holding control until 1818, when they finally agreed to a joint occupation of the land. The British did not fully leave Astoria until 1846. There is no doubting the rich history has deep roots grounded in this Columbia River town. When the history combines with the scenery, the harmony will surely bring you back for more!

The Riverwalk
A six-mile paved walkway overlooking the beautiful Columbia River. In addition to the remarkable views, guests can explore the statues, shops, cafes, docks, and historic canneries dotting the path. Guests, who wish to, can choose to board the riverfront trolley that runs along the banks for an extra fee. The Astoria Riverwalk, also known as the Astoria River Trail, stretches the entire length of the city’s waterfront, connecting restaurants and breweries, museums, and dozens of other attractions. It passes under the Astoria-Megler Bridge, the largest continuous truss bridge in the United States, arcing out across the Columbia River toward the hazy hillsides of Washington state. The trail follows the route of the Astoria and Columbia River Railroad that was completed in 1898.

The Flavel House
As one of the best-preserved examples of Queen Anne architecture in the Northwest, the Flavel House survives today as a landmark of local and national significance. The house was built as a retirement home in 1885 for Columbia River bar pilot, Captain George Flavel, and his family. The Flavel House has been restored and furnished to portray the elegance of the Victorian period and the history of the Flavel family. Its decorative exterior, with hipped roof, balconies, and verandas, is distinguished by a fourth-story cupola. The interior of the home features original Eastlake influenced woodwork, period furnishings, six exotic hardwood fireplace mantels, and fourteen-foot ceilings with plaster crown molding and medallions.

Astoria Column
This magnificent monument stands 600 feet above sea level and gives the perfect view to Young’s Bay, the Coast Range, the Columbia River, and in the distance, even the Pacific Ocean. Ralph Budd initiated the project to celebrate Astoria’s early settlers. He hired Italian immigrant and artist Atillilio Pusterla to model a piece inspired by Trajan’s Column in Rome, featuring hand-painted spiral frieze work, stretching over 500 feet if it were to be unwound. The Astor family, with the help of the Great Northern Railroad, generously donated the column to Astoria in July of 1926.

Heritage Museum
Astoria’s Old City Hall building, a neoclassical structure designed by prominent Portland architect Emil Schacht in 1904, is home to the Historical Society’s collection and archive. Clatsop County’s rich and exciting history is featured in the museum’s permanent and changing exhibit galleries. Objects on display include a 1,000-year-old hunting implement, finely crafted 19th-century Chinook and Clatsop Indian baskets, and a sea otter pelt and beaver hat which illuminate the early history of Astoria. Logging and fishing, the two economic mainstays since 1870, are represented in collections of tools, equipment, and photographs. The stories of the many diverse ethnic groups that settled in the area are depicted in the Emigrants Gallery. A recent addition to the Heritage Museum’s exhibits and located on the second floor, is “Vice and Virtue in Clatsop County: 1890 to Prohibition.” The gallery contains a partially reconstructed saloon and illustrates Astoria’s seedy past when the town was known along the West Coast for its infamous saloons and brothels.

Columbia River Maritime Museum
Here, guests can experience interactive displays, galleries and collections representing the history of the mighty Columbia River throughout time. The museum was founded in 1962 when Rolf Klep returned to his birthplace after retiring from his art career on the East Coast. Klep was a long-time collector of maritime artifacts and he began to recruit his colleagues and friends to help establish a museum to present these collections. The museum was the first in Oregon to meet national accreditation standards and is designated the official maritime museum of Oregon. After a $6 million expansion, the museum now holds six galleries, the Great Hall, and the Lightship Columbia. Enjoy over 30,000 artifacts and 20,000 photos as you travel through this expansive maritime museum! Trail Interactive exhibit! (Admission Additional)

Lewis and Clark Fort Clatsop

On this American Empress exclusive excursion, guests will trace the journey of one of America’s most famous historical duos: Lewis and Clark. Our journey will bring us to Station Camp, occupied for ten days in November of 1805 by the Corps of Discovery and was used as a departure point for an overland trek to their first views of the Pacific Ocean. Get a look at what is known as Dismal Nitch, a cove along the Columbia River noted as Lewis and Clark’s final campsite before sighting the Pacific Ocean.  At Fort Clatsop, part of the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park.  Made famous as the winter encampment for the Corps of Discovery. Here, guests can enjoy exhibits in the interpretive center, exhibit hall, book store and gift shop, view films outlining the historic journey and explore a replica of the forts built by The Corps of Discovery in their attempts to maintain shelter during the harsh winters.

All shore excursions, prices, and information are subject to change without notice.

Transportation
Provided
Duration
3 hours

Day 6: Vancouver, WA (Portland, OR)

Arrival 8:00 AM
Vancouver, WA (Portland, OR)

Thank you for cruising with us! We hope that you had a memorable experience and look forward to welcoming you aboard in the future. Enjoy Vancouver at your leisure or consider a Post-Cruise Premium Shore Excursion with airport transfer.